Class Notes (835,750)
Canada (509,374)
Psychology (3,518)
PSY328H1 (73)
Lecture

Lecture 2-The Law.docx

6 Pages
91 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY328H1
Professor
Dax Urbszat
Semester
Winter

Description
Thursday, January 16, 2014 Lecture 2 – Law  Correlational Research • Establishes whether there is a relationship between two or more variables • CANNOT INFER CAUSALITY 1. Directionality problem a. Does a cause b or b cause a? 2. Potential for a third variable (confound) a. Can affect the dependent measure  b. Not possible to compensate for all confounds  • Self­esteem and GPA is  moderately positively correlated  • Directionality problem exists  here – does self esteem affect  GPA or vice versa? • It is a correlation but it is  governed by a third variable  (confound)  Experimental Research • Considered the most powerful tool for determining causal relationships o Important for treatment, prevention, diagnosis and many other factors  • Random Assignment: ensures that every participant has an equal chance of being  assigned to any of the conditions o Probability suggests that all the probability inhuman beings will be  randomly assigned  o Random assignment is not always reliable  • This minimizes the chance that a pre­existing difference between groups is the  cause of the “experimental effect” o There is a chance that a test’s results will not be able to be repeated  Research Design • Independent variable  o Manipulated variable  (e.g., mood induction)  Sad group and happy group  o Individual difference variable (e.g., high vs. low self esteem)  Need to do a two by two study with 4 groups  • Dependent variable o Whatever you decide to measure; the output  • Cover Story/Deception • Random Assignment o One of the variables must be an experimental variable where you assign  people into groups  • Confounds o Think about what may go wrong when confounds are present  • Reliability o Use instruments that have been psychometrically tested and are reliable  o Research the types of scales that will be used  • Validity The Law in Canada • Common Law vs. Civil Law o Common Law – Canada is a Common Law country; although we have our  independence, we still function as a Common Law; Canada relies on past  cases to help future cases   Follows Adversarial system – one side is the defence, other is  prosecution; judges are neutral   Based on stare decisis/precedence   Idea that we have our law system (rules) based just on previous  cases   This could lead (in extreme) to less getting at the truth and more to  winning cases   Judges just makes sure everything is going fairly  Draws abstract rules form specific cases and allowed further cases  to cite this previous case and have a wider interpretation    o Civil Law – in France and other European countries function under civil  law; it follows a statutorily law; statues are created by the government and  judges read the statutes   Follows Inquisitorial system ­­ judges and lawyers try to figure out  what happened   Statutes – laws written out and inquisitorial  Criminal law in Quebec follows the common law because we have  a centralized constitutional system compared to the States where  there is a decentralized system (laws are different between states)  Based on trying to get the bottom of the matter   Starts out with abstract rules and then the judge applies them to  specific cases  • Statutory Law o Will of the people or will of the government in power • Stare decisis: “to abide by decided cases” • Hierarchical o Common law is a hierarchical system  Courts • Supreme Court of Canada • Court of Appeal     Federal Court of Appeal • Superior Court      Federal Court   Tax Court o Above Provincial is Superior Court   Both Provincial and Superior Court appeal to….  o Federal court will appeal at Federal Court of Appeal  • Provincial Courts o Lowest level of actual courts o Can appeal to Court of Appeal o Only have judges, no juries  • Administrative tribunals (appeal to Superior Court of Justice) Areas of Legal Practice • Administrative ­ Environmental • Torts/personal injury ­ Immigration • International               ­ Intellectual property • Constitutional ­ Administrative • Cor
More Less

Related notes for PSY328H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit