Class Notes (836,590)
Canada (509,861)
Psychology (3,518)
PSY396H1 (20)
Ljubojevic (19)
Lecture 7

PSY396H1 Lecture 7 March 6

11 Pages
138 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY396H1
Professor
Ljubojevic
Semester
Winter

Description
PSY396H1S L7 March 06, 2014 • Bupropion: used to increase DA so that smoker doesn’t get  craving Marijuana • Cannabis sativa – common hemp plant o Active component: tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) • Rewarding effects: o Stimulant & sedative properties o Sense of well­being, relaxation o Associated w increased DA release in Nacc  o other effects in the CNS •  Impairments:  Short Term Memory & tasks involving multiple  steps o Addiction potential is low o but the dependence seems to occur   dependence found in animal studies  further work needed to understand how to works in Synapse in NAcc (from VTA) humans • Linked to: (after heavy prolonged use) o respiratory problems o elevated heart rate o amotivational syndrome  Medicinal Uses of Marijuana • Treat nausea  • Block seizures • Dilate bronchioles of asthmatics •  Decrease severity of glaucoma  • Reduce some forms of pain THC • Fat­soluble • Binds to recs in BG, hippocampus, cerebellum, neocortex  • Endogenous ligand is anandamide (lipid) o Anandamide involved in retrograde transmission • Strongest effect on 5HT2A recs • Rec is called cannabinoid receptor, most notably CB1 (in CNS) • Potential treatment: rimonabant (CB1 rec antagonist) Food Addiction?  • Is obesity caused by a problem w regulating the hedonic  • (Glut synapses appear in VTA, NAcc, amygdala) (reward properties) of food? o Sugary & fatty foods as drugs?  Hallucinogens  • For instance: LSD [lysergic acid diethylamide] o MDMA can also act as a hallucinogen The Hungry Brain Responds to Food  •  Intoxication alters sensory experiences  o ‘trip’ o Hallucination o Increased awareness of internal and external stimuli o Also, panic attack, anxiety, nausea, paranoia  •  Boost 5­HT neurotransmission  o Primarily as 5­HT2A rec agonists (also 1A & 2B) • Rapidly produce tolerance o Desensitization of 5­HT2A recs  • Mechanism of action not fully understood o Also affect noradrenergic synapses – can they imitate NE  or do they modulate the activity? • Affect nucleus accumbens Location of Insula & OFC Fig. 2 from Dolan (2002) shows brain areas in relation to anatomy of  head, eyes. • Point out PFC, and then its subdivisions. • yellow: orbitofrontal cortex From fig. 4. (Wang et al. (2004)  Horizontal slices arranged in dorsal to ventral order from top row, left. : anterior cingulate cortex  Color­coded SPM results superimposed on MR images. • green: posterior cingulate cortex  Red arrows in top row point to somatosensory cortex. • purple: insular cortex, or insula   Other red arrows point to: In (insula), ST (superior temporal cortex),  OF (orbitofrontal cortex). • orange: amygdala Food addiction? Hungry brain:  • Activation seen in several cortical areas, including insula (In) &  orbitofrontal (OFC). o Insula contains gustatory cortex. • Response of OFC was correlated w hunger. o Relates to the drive to go out & seek food, wanting food o particularly interesting • PFC might be final area activated when a person does­drug­ seeking bhvr o Connection btwn drug­seeking bhvr & food­seeking  bhvr Hunger & the OF Cortex Fig. 6 from Wang et al. (2004) •  data from 11 participants From Liebman (2012)  • PET scans show the density of DA recs in the corpus striatum  of healthy vs. addicted people. •  Addicted brain : down­regulation of DA recs in striatum o Also observed in obese patients • Fewer dopamine Rs may be a result of over­stimulation of those  Rs as the addiction develops (“desensitization” of Rs).  Caffeine Interpretation • OFC activity represents activation of the hedonic/cognitive   network. • OFC may be important for the drive to seek out and eat food, the  “wanting” of food. • Report fatigue during coffee use & during withdrawal • After a week of last caffeine intake  ▯return to normal • Withdrawal wears off quickly • Most ppl use caffeine in some form Caffeine Mechanism (not fully understood yet) • Adenosine NT o Released by glia & neurons throughout the brain o Inhibitory action o Also, vasodilator  • Caffeine acts as adenosine receptor antagonist o Prevents inhibition (excitatory effect) o Mechanism of action is poorly understood • Drop in ability to concentrate for a couple days  Promotes DA activity indirectly, by changing NE  Psychosis & Schizophrenia activity   Since Adenosine recs coupled w DA recs • • As the day progresses, Adenosine increases in the brain Psychosis Is Caffeine Addictive?  • Psychosis – Broad term (ex. hallucinations, delusions)  o Disturbed thought, emotion, bhvr also associated • Caffeine is extensively used  o Side effects of long term use?  o Often associated w schizophrenia o Neuroadaptation & withdrawal effects • Psychosis & Schizophrenia are heterogeneous • Tolerance develops due to many of the effects, probably due to  o Often terms misused • Psychosis is a commonly misused & stigmatized term up­regulation of the adenosine recs. • Withdrawal: o By itself it is not a diagnosis nor a disorder but a  o Headaches, drowsiness, impaired concentration,  syndrome: a cluster of symptoms that can be associated  fatigue, (­)ve mood ­ these go away after a few days with a number of psychiatric disorders o Do not get dependence like drugs of abuse – no craving • Some psychiatric illnesses such as Schizophrenia or  Withdrawal & Tolerance (Time course of withdrawal in regular users) Substance­Induced Psychosis require psychosis o psychosis is the defining feature of the illness • Psychosis can also exist in other disorders w/o being the  defining feature o known as an  associated   feature , such as Major Depression  or Alzheimer’s Dementia  • In its most basic form, the defining features of psychosis include  the presence of hallucinations & delusions • Other symptoms include disorganized speech and thoughts,  inappropriate behaviour, gross distortions of reality &  impaired motor fn • Headache after a couple days on placebo • Psychosis can be observed in either a disease state such as  • Withdrawal effects seem obvious but disappear very quickly (onlyschizophrenia, or from prolonged psychoactive drug use a couple days) • Drugs that can induce a psychotic state include stimulants such  as amphetamine, anti­inflammatories such as steroids,  hallucinogens such as LSD or PCP, and anti­parkinsonian  drugs such as L­DOPA (boosts dopaminergic activity) Schizophrenia • Most common psychiatric illness w psychosis as the defining  feature • Affects 1% of population • Lifetime prevalence • begins mainly in young age • 25­50% of patients diagnosed w schizophrenia attempt suicide o Risk is 8­9 times normal population o 10% eventually succeed  o M=F DSM­IV (TR) • Accounts for ½ of all admissions to mental hospitals • During a 1­month period, 2 or more of following symptoms: o high rates of rehospitalization  o  delusions • Onset is mostly late teens/early 20’s (mostly males) o  hallucinations o Women age of onset is approximately 5 yrs later o disorganized speech • Recurring illness therefore treatment is lifelong o grossly disorganized / catatonic bhvr • Severe impairment of social, occupation, educational fn’ing o (­)ve symptoms o  ▯poverty, poor housing, discrimination  low response to envt’al stimuli & social contact • Large research on schizophrenia 3 main symptom clusters in schizophrenia: • (+)ve Symptoms Life Course of Schizophrenia Phase I (Pre­morbid)  • (­)ve Symptoms • Largely asymptomatic  • Cognitive Impairments (sometimes these are sub­divided into  • No bhvr’al cues the 2 preceding categories) • Suspicion that certain neural events are occurring o So disease begins in this phase (+)ve Symptoms: symptoms that are present which are in excess of  normal fn Phase II (Prodromal)  • Hallucinations: Sensing something that is not rly there  o false perceptions in absence of any relevant sensory  • Prodromal “oddness” & onset of subtle (­)ve symptoms stimulus o social withdrawal o odd bhvrs • Delusions: A belief or set of beliefs which usually involve a  o changes in emotions misinterpretation of perceptions or experiences o false beliefs that have no basis in reality o slight loss of fn • Disorganized speech & thought, including: • ~late teens o incoherence, loose associations, neologisms (made­up  Phase III (Active)  words), poor verbal fluency (word salad), excessive  • Active phase concreteness, echolalia (mimicking)  • Destructive (+)ve symptoms Hallucinations • Multiple cycles of treatment & relapse • Can occur in any of 5 sense modalities, although auditory and  • Long duration tactile are the most commonly occurring • Low level of fn’ing, psychotic episodes • Visual hallucinations generally only occur during the earliest  o May involve aggressive bhvr towards self stages of onset, if at all o Likely to develop another disorder on the side • Hearing voices is the most widely reported hallucination • ~21­40 yrs old • Most­known by the public Delusions  • Most common delusional theme is persecutory  • Other common themes include: Phase IV (Static / Residual)  • Static phase, poor social fn’ing o Referential (erroneously thinking that unrelated  • prominent (­)ve & cognitive symptoms phenomena refer to oneself) o Somatic • > 45 yrs­old o Religious o Grandiose • Theme of delusion must be out of keeping w the patient’s  educational, cultural and social background  •  Nongenetic risk factors  (­)ve Symptoms: symptoms where there is a  lack   of normal fn  o Prenatal & perinatal complications • Affect Flattening: restrictions in the range & intensity of•  Neuroanatomical   emotions o Structural cerebral abnormalities o (emotional blunting) •  Neurobiochemical   • Avolition: lack of initiation of goal­directed bhvrs o Glutamate o (ambivalence) o Dopamine • Anhedonia: lack of interest in pleasurable activities • Not mututally exclusive hypotheses • Alogia: restrictions in fluency & productivity of thoughts and  o Likely genetic & nongenetic factors   ▯physical  speech abnormalities  ▯disruptions in brain chemistry o Somewhat overlaps w disorganized speech • Asociality: withdrawal from relationships Genetics of Schizophrenia •  Family Studies   Cognitive Impairments o Inherit a tendency for schizophrenia, not a specific form  • Impaired attention & info processing, including problems  (paranoid, disorganized, catatonic, undifferentiated) of  concentrating schiz. • Impaired executive fn’ing including prioritizing & impulse •  Twin Studies   control o Concordance related to severity • Impaired learning  memory  higher concordance when 1 twin has severe SCHZ •  Adoption Studies     • Attention Problems  o Risk of schizophrenia remains high in adopted children  o If you are sleepy, you may experience distractibility,  w a biological parent suffering from schizophrenia intrusion of ideas, mind wandering… o Imagine exaggeration of these qualities • Many psychiatric disorders are multifactorial (caused by the  o Moreover, perception is intensified (sights and sounds  interaction of external & genetic factors) and from the genetic  magnified) point of view very often polygenically determined  like brightness, volume controls turned up o partial heritable component although no single  o Interaction of distractibility w intrusive experience =  chromosomal locus nor gene has been identified problems w attention Cognitive Impairments: Attention • Reaction time (RT) ­ speed of response to a stimulus o Better RT when prep interval is short o Poor RT w long prep interval (distractibility)  Due to poor executive fn • Apprehension span ­ accurately detecting a target stimulus in an  array of stimuli (may have distracter stimuli) o When arrays are simple ­ “find t” ( e  t  d); SCHZ do OK o When arrays are more complex ­ SCHZ do more poorly • Smooth Pursuit Eye Movement (follow object moving on a  screen) o Irregular SPEM in SCHZ o Perceptual deficit of top­down eye movement Schizophrenia: Core Symptom Clusters •  Relative risk  for schizophrenia is around: o 1% for normal population o 6% for parents o 10% for siblings  Goes up to 17% for DZ twins  Almost 50% for MZ twins • As proportion of shared genetic material increases  ▯concordance  • Burden to society since the condition lasts for many yrs increases o Sharing 100% genetic material  ▯~50% concordance Etiology (not completely known) • Usually btwn 6 & 20% •  Genetic  o Several genes on dif chromosomes interact w envt Nongenetic risk factors o The stress­diathesis model  •  set up a stage of development of schizophrenia •  Pre­natal & birth envt   o ‘doomed from the womb’  o Complications during pregnancy • Genetic or acquired insults may lead to:   ▯  brain dysfunction/damage o inadequate neuronal selection, poor cell migration,  aberrant synapse formation, and/or faulty connections  ex. nutritional o Obstetrical & Birth Complications • Abnormalities may lie dormant for childhood yrs  Caesarean section o  ▯ reveal themselves only after adolescent re­structuring  (pruning) of the brain  Anoxia at birth o Monochorionic vs. Dichorionic MZ twins Structural Abonormalities  sharing a placenta increases concordance  involves sharing chemicals • Enlarged ventricles o Due to increased subcortical cell loss  depends on when the zygote splits • Reduced grey matter in frontal cortex •  Season of birth   o Prenatal virus exposure •  Temporal Lobe  nd o Reduced volume in amygdala, hippocampus  influenza virus exposure during 2  trimester • Reduced volume of Basal Ganglia o Vitamin D deficiency Seasonal Effect CT Scan of Normal vs Schz  • Enlarged ventricle in Schz • Highest incidndce among those born in spring o Their 2  trimester was spent in winter when mother gets  low Vitamin D Seasonal Effect: Flu in 2  Trimester
More Less

Related notes for PSY396H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit