Class Notes (923,248)
CA (543,180)
UTSG (45,887)
Rotman Commerce (1,107)
RSM332H1 (206)
Booth (4)
Lecture

Class3

5 Pages
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Department
Rotman Commerce
Course Code
RSM332H1
Professor
Booth

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The Time Value of Money
Suppose market interest rates are 10%/year.
That means, if you invest 1000 today, in 1 year, you will have 1000(1.10) = 1,100 =
1,000 (your original principal) + 100 interest. We could also ask, what is the present
value (PV) (the value NOW) of 1,100 to be received in 1 year, if market interest rates are
10%/year? Answer: PV = X such that X(1.10) = 1100 => X = 1100/1.10 = 1000.
What is the PV of 1000 in 1 year, if the interest rate is 10%? Answer: X such that X(1.10)
= 1000 => X = 1000/1.10 = 909.09 What would you rather have, 909.09 now or 1000 in
1 year?
Example: If interest rates are 12%/year, what does 1500 grow to in 5 years? In 1 year,
1500 => 1500(1.12) = 1680 = 1500 + 180 of interest. In the second year, 1680 =>
1680(1.12) = 1881.60. Note: 1881.60 –1500 = 381.60 and 180 x 2 = 360 and 381.60 –
360 = 21.60. 21.60 is the interest earned in the second year, on the interest earned in the
first year.
Benjamin Franklin: Money makes money, and the money that money makes, makes
more money.
In 5 years, 1500 => 1500(1.12)^5 = 1500(1.7623) = 2643.51. We say, 2643.51 is the
future value (FV) of 1500 in 5 years if interest rates are 12% annually with annual
compounding. In general: FV = C0(1+r)T where C0 is the amount invested, r = the annual
rate and T = the number of years it is invested for. Similarly, What is the PV of 2643.51
in 5 years if r = 12%? PV = X such that X(1.12)5 = 2643.51 => X = 2643.51/(1.12)5 =
1500.
PV of an amount C1 in 1 year: PV = C1/(1+r)
PV of an amount CT in T years is PV = CT/(1+r)T
Suppose we invest C0 now in return for:
C1 in 1 year
C2 in 2 years
CT in T years
First note: If r is the appropriate annual interest rate, the PV of the future payments is
given by: PV= C1/(1+r) + C2/(1+r)2 + + CT/(1+r)T
www.notesolution.com
And the Net Present Value (NPV) = -C0 + C1/(1+r) + C2/(1+r)2 + + CT/(1+r)T
A general goal is to be able to calculate the value at any given time of a series of
payments made at various times.
Example:
Find the value at time 2 of the following payments, if r = 8% annually:
50 100 50 100 300 200
-----------------------------------------------------
-3-2-1012345
Answer: 50(1.08)4 + 100(1.08)3 + 50(1.08) + 100 + 300/(1.08)2 + 200/(1.08)3 = 763.96
Stated or Nominal rates of Interest
If the rate of interest is 10% with annual compounding, then 100 => 100(1.1) = 110 in 1
year. Suppose the rate is a 10% nominal rate with semi annual compounding. This means
(by definition) a rate of 5% per ½ year. So, 100 => 100(1.05) in ½ year, and 105 =>
105(1.05) = 110.25 in 1 year. 100(1.05)2 = 110.25
Note: 100(1.1025) = 110.25 if the effective annual rate is 10.25% so a nominal rate of
10% with semi annual compounding is equivalent to an effective annual rate of 10.25%.
Similarly, 10% with quarterly compounding means: 100 => 100(1.025)4 = 110.3813 in 1
year => annual effective rate of: 10.3813%.
In general, if r is a nominal rate with compounding m times per year, means a rate of r/m
per mth of a year. We write EAR to represent the Effective Annual Rate.
(1+r/m)m = (1 +EAR) => EAR = (1+r/m)m – 1 or r = m[(1+EAR)1/m1]
Example:
What is the FV of 1500 in 4 years if the interest rate is a nominal rate of 18% with
monthly compounding? FV = 1500(1+.18/12)48 = 1500(1+.015)48 = 3065.22. What is the
PV of 5000 in 5 years if the interest rate is 18% with monthly compounding? PV = 5000/
(1.015)60 = 2046.48.
Suppose we invest 1000 for 1 year at 10% with compounding as follows. How much do
we have in each case?
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Description
The Time Value of Money Suppose market interest rates are 10%year. That means, if you invest 1000 today, in 1 year, you will have 1000(1.10) = 1,100 = 1,000 (your original principal) + 100 interest. We could also ask, what is the present value (PV) (the value NOW) of 1,100 to be received in 1 year, if market interest rates are 10%year? Answer: PV = X such that X(1.10) = 1100 => X = 11001.10 = 1000. What is the PV of 1000 in 1 year, if the interest rate is 10%? Answer: X such that X(1.10) = 1000 => X = 10001.10 = 909.09 What would you rather have, 909.09 now or 1000 in 1 year? Example: If interest rates are 12%year, what does 1500 grow to in 5 years? In 1 year, 1500 => 1500(1.12) = 1680 = 1500 + 180 of interest. In the second year, 1680 => 1680(1.12) = 1881.60. Note: 1881.60 1500 = 381.60 and 180 x 2 = 360 and 381.60 360 = 21.60. 21.60 is the interest earned in the second year, on the interest earned in the first year. Benjamin Franklin: Money makes money, and the money that money makes, makes more money. In 5 years, 1500 => 1500(1.12)^5 = 1500(1.7623) = 2643.51. We say, 2643.51 is the future value (FV) of 1500 in 5 years if interest rates are 12% annually with annual T compounding. In general: FV = C (1+r0 where C is the a0ount invested, r = the annual rate and T = the number of years it is invested for. Similarly, What is the PV of 2643.51 in 5 years if r = 12%? PV = X such that X(1.12) = 2643.51 => X = 2643.51(1.12) = 5 1500. PV of an amount C in 1 year: PV = C (1+r1 PV of an amount C in T years is PV = C (1+rT T Suppose we invest C no0 in return for: C 1n 1 year C 2n 2 years C Tn T years First note: If r is the appropriate annual interest rate, the PV of the future payments is given by: PV= C (1+r) + C (12r) + + C (1+r)T T www.notesolution.com
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