Class Notes (977,482)
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SOC101Y1 (1,011)
Xing (16)
Lecture

Domestic Work

1 Page
45 Views
Summer 2010

Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOC101Y1
Professor
Xing

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Domestic Work
Pre-industry society
Production site and consumption site
Women also play important roles in market production
Men/women are economic co-workers
Men actively took care of children, esp boys to teach work at early ages
Industrial society
Mainly a consumption site
Men: paid workers = breadwinners
Women: homemakers, depend on husband’s income
Even after WW2 (1960s ) when womens participation in paid work has increased
significantly, the image of women who belong to home as primary caregiver and
homemaker has not changed
Problems:
Limited in domestic work
Women are expected to make home comfor table and attractive
Women engage in so much energy-consuming housework yet unpaid and undervalued
(eco value = more than $300 billion per year = more than 30% of gross national product)
Trend
Working mom rate increases since 1960s
One of the highest among developed countries
In 2006, more than 70% mothers work
Yet, many (30%) still work part-time because of housework and childrearing
Housework participation
Men: increased compared to the past but mainly in maintenance and repairing (= f lexible,
controllable)
Women: daily core housework (= demand more time, more energy) yet getting better due
to take-out meals, dishwashers, pre-packaged food, and simply not that obsessed with
cleaning
Unhappy ending: double days for working moms -> tensions and conf licts -> low
mar r iage rate, low fertility rate, high divorce rate
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Description
Domestic Work Pre-industry society Production site and consumption site Women also play important roles in market production Menwomen are economic co-workers Men actively took care of children, esp boys to teach work at early ages Industrial society Mainly a consumption site Men: paid workers = breadwinners Women: homemakers, depend on husbands income Even after WW2 (1960s) when womens participation in paid work has increased significantly, the image of women who belong to home as primary caregiver and homemaker has not changed Problems: Limited in domestic work Women are expected to make home comfortable and attractive Women engage in so much energy-consuming housework yet unpaid and undervalued (eco value
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