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Lecture

Lecture 1

3 Pages
97 Views
Winter 2011

Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOC102H1
Professor
Teppermann

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Social Inequalities Lecture 1 (110111)
Social inequality is not only harmful for the individual people, but it will affect
the society as a whole.
Inequalities are about hierarchical (better-worse) differences between and two
people or things.
Sociologists ask themselves how these natural inequalities become social
inequalities and with what results, interested in how people invent or construct
inequalities.
Gerhard Lenski showed that status consistency has consequences for social
action that we cannot predict from the so called dimensions of status alone.
Rousseau
Society gives various rights of privileges to certain group of people. Looking at
the natural inequalities between people which thus lead to social inequalities.
People are not discriminated because of natural grounds but on social ground.
-it is totally against natural law that imbecile lead wise men
When we know that social unequal privilege has gone too far, we reject it.
Treating everyone fairly vs treating everyone equally.
Eg. A blind person and a normal person doing the same test within the same
time.
According to economic liberals today, inequality is the price to be paid for
dynamic economic growth under capitalism
Social inequality is the opposite of social justice.
1st Equity or fair exchange- the equivalence of outputs to inputs for all the parties
in an exchange. If all studies all will get As
2nd Distributive justice- fair allocation of resources rights and obligations across
an entire category of contenders. Allows for the existence of inequalities of
outcome so long as these are justified by inequalities of input. Quota of As
3rd Procedural justice guarantees that fair procedures will always be followed in
making allocative decisions even if these fair procedures result in unequal
outcome. Rules and regulations in tests
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Description
Social Inequalities Lecture 1 (110111) Social inequality is not only harmful for the individual people, but it will affect the society as a whole. Inequalities are about hierarchical (better-worse) differences between and two people or things. Sociologists ask themselves how these natural inequalities become social inequalities and with what results, interested in how people invent or construct inequalities. Gerhard Lenski showed that status consistency has consequences for social action that we cannot predict from the so called dimensions of status alone. Rousseau Society gives various rights of privileges to certain group of people. Looking at the natural inequalities between people which thus lead to social inequalities. People are not discriminated because of natural grounds but on social ground. -it is totally against natural law that imbecile lead wise men When we know that social unequal privilege has gone too far, we r
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