Class Notes (834,721)
Canada (508,692)
Sociology (3,252)
SOC205H1 (32)
Lecture 4

week 4 Readings

3 Pages
122 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC205H1
Professor
Brent Berry
Semester
Spring

Description
Week 4 Readings:  Analyzing and Interpreting the City: Theory and Method—Hannigan • Dilemma  ▯One the one hand, the development of cities has advanced in lockstep with that of society itself,  making it difficult to parse out those structures and processes that are distinctly urban. At the same time, life in  the city has always seemed to possess its own unique dynamic • Savage and Warde identify 8 recurrent threads and themes around which urban sociology revolves:  1. What it feels like to live in a modern city and whether there is any universal ‘urban’ experience 2. Whether, by contrast, places are distinctive and why people become attached to them 3. How urban life is affected by the features of local social structure such as class, gender, ethnicity 4. How informal l bonds develop and to what extent affective relationships with family, neighbours, and  friends are determined externally 5. How to explain the history of urbanization and population concentration 6. The basic features of the spatial structures of cities and whether different spatial arrangements generate  distinctive modes of social interaction 7. The nature of and solutions to ‘urban’ problems such as congestion, poverty, and street violence 8. How urban politics are conducted, what influences political participation, and what impact the state has on  the daily life of its local citizens • Urban sociologists have developed 3 theories:  o The culturalist orientation vs. structural orientation   Culturalist orientation: deals with the experiential aspect of cities, addressing how urban life  feels, how people react to living in an urban setting, and how the city organizes personal lives  Structuralist orientation: holds that the ultimate causes of urban ways of thinking and acting  are found externally in wider patterns of wealth and power in society  o Spatial vs. associational emphasis   The importance of geographical space in explaining patterns of behaviour  • Ex. Slums= products of a fundamental division of labour in industrial society rather than  as the result of deliberate government policies directed towards poverty and public  housing. Residents of the slums were seen as being wired into their own small, localized  social world while casting adrift in a wider metropolis  • This was seen to be as the most important, but 70s afterwards:  70s afterwards, shift to alternative, non­spatial forms of community, nothing that the city folk  are far more isolated from one another. They are involved in non­spatialized networks of  family and friends o Realist vs. constructionist interpretation   Do city dwellers have any degree of agency/power to shape the physical and social space in  which they reside and work, or is it rigidly predetermined by ecological or economic factors  beyond their immediate control?  The beginnings of Sociological Interpretations of Cities: The Chicago School • ‘The City’ was a pioneering attempt to outline a scientific program for understanding the essence of the city  both conceptually and empirically  • Park was interested in the evolving physical form of the city (different types of land use, etc.)Ł inspired the  approach human ecology  • Park believed that the city was composed of a constellation of different social worlds each with its own distinct  language, traditions and way of life Ł Urban ethnography  • Shift from rural to urban  ▯a collective community identity to a more individual one where money became  central  • Urban also offers greater social mobility as well as a more diverse and tolerant environment for artists,  musicians and other creative types 5 Theoretical Models: 1. Human Ecology Model • The study of the relationship between people and their environment  • The breakdown of the city into separate communities bounded by transportation o
More Less

Related notes for SOC205H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit