Class Notes (835,324)
Canada (509,101)
Sociology (3,252)
SOC220H1 (34)
Lecture

SOC220F - Labour Markets and Social Mobility - Oct 4,13.docx

3 Pages
82 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC220H1
Professor
Josh Curtis
Semester
Fall

Description
Week 4 Lecture Study Notes – Labour Markets and Social Mobility Social mobility – the upward or downward movement of individuals (or groups) into different positions in the class  hierarchy. a) Upward mobility, b) immobility, c) downward mobility. Inter­generational mobility – mobility between generations (typical concern of researchers) Intra­generational mobility – your career trajectory alone (single generations) Human capital – market is open and unbiased Labour market segmentation – there are pervasive inequalities within and across different industries that limit the  access of qualified people • Picture a society with where upward mobility or class reproduction is unlikely o We wouldn’t be in school – would not believe that getting an education would improve our lives  and lead to better jobs • What about a society with too much class movement? o Everything would be chaotic, too unpredictable Relative mobility – likelihood for upward class movement Exchange mobility – movement between classes is a result of individual efforts Structural mobility – movement is a result of labour market and social institutions Implications of people now getting more degrees vs. past years • Surplus of degrees + The degree requirements (of the ‘value’ of a degree) always changing • Class background may become important if education alone does not lead to job closure.* Occupations are related to other proxies of social standing o It is easy to measure in surveys (people usually tell the truth with these questions) o Occupational rankings are stable over time and across societies • Open societies – countries with high rates of mobility • Closed societies – countries with low rates of mobility Mobility • Structural mobility  o Mobility resulting from a change in the distribution of occupations, expanding opportunities in  some and decreasing them in others. o Forced vertical mobility that results from a change in the distribution of statuses • Exchange mobility (social fluidity) o Whether your chances of reaching a particular class is constrained by your parents class  background • Absolute mobility – total amount of movement of people between classes o Living standards are increasing in absolute terms: You are better off than your parents, and your  children will be better off than you. • Relative mobility – the chance of mobility of a member of one social class in comparison with a member  from another class Important Concepts • What is a mobility table? o Social class (columns) by parent’s social class  (rows)  o Diagonals: inheritance (or immobility) o Above the diagonal: Upward mobility o Below the diagonal: Downward mobility • Diagonal row represents immobility (class reproduction  – people who didn’t change) • 210 immobile = 0.525 % ­ just over 50% were  immobile • 90 upwardly mobile = 0.225 %  • 100 downwardly mobile = 0.25 % • (Divided by the total sample size in the mob
More Less

Related notes for SOC220H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit