Class Notes (835,495)
Canada (509,212)
Sociology (3,252)
SOC265H1 (64)
.. (6)
Lecture

SOC265H1F Syllabus(1).pdf

5 Pages
237 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC265H1
Professor
..
Semester
Fall

Description
University of Toronto  SOC265H1F – Gender & Society  Instructor: Diana Miller  September‐December 2011    CONTACT INFORMATION  Class meetings:      4‐6pm Mondays, room TBA  Instructor’s Email:     [email protected]  Instructor’s Office Hours:   Thursdays 3‐5pm or by appointment, room #225 in the Sociology  Department, 725 Spadina Avenue (SE corner of Bloor/Spadina)      Teaching assistant:     TBA, office hours by appointment, Soc. Department room #225    COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES  Welcome to Gender Relations. In this course, you will learn what it means to take a sociological  approach to gender. We will begin by reviewing theoretical approaches to gender, and debates about  what “gender” actually means. Is it an individual identity? A feature of social systems? A performance?  We will then explore some major empirical areas of research on gender, including paid and unpaid work,  sexuality, and the body.     EVALUATION  th Test #1         Monday October 24 , 2011th   25%  Assignment #1:  Media analysis   Monday, October 17 , 2011    20%  Assignment #2:  Research Paper   Monday, November 21 , 2011    30%  Test #2         Monday, December 5 , 2011 h   25%    Detailed instructions will be provided about the written assignments in class.          COURSE POLICIES    Discussion: Students are encouraged to ask questions and discuss the course material during lectures.  Please keep the tone of all discussion respectful and constructive; we are all here to learn, and  maintaining a safe space for discussion is crucial to this learning experience. As an instructor, I expect  the following behaviour from you, and you can expect the same from me:     DO NOT use personal attacks; critique ideas, not people  DO NOT use rude or offensive language (e.g. swearing, racist/sexist/homophobic slurs)      DO ask for clarification when someone says something you disagree with, rather than simply  assuming that they are wrong   DO be open to new ideas – even ones that might change your position or opinion    Email: If you email the course instructor or teaching assistant for assistance, you can expect a response  within two business days. Before sending an email, please check to see if your question is already  answered in the syllabus or on Blackboard. Email is most suitable for questions that are clear, concise,  and easily answerable; if you are confused about the course material or need to discuss a concept, you  should attend office hours. You may not receive a response to your email if a) it does not originate from  a UToronto email account, as it may be filtered into a spam folder, or b) if it contains material that is  rude, offensive, or otherwise inappropriate for a professional academic environment.    1      Missed classes: You are responsible for all material covered in class. I do not recommend that you miss  class, but if you must be absent then it is your responsibility to catch up on the material covered that  day. Make friends in class and find someone who will share their notes with you – the instructor and TAs  do not provide notes or other supplementary materials.      Late Papers: Late work is not acceptable, and will result in a 3% deduction from the assigned grade per  calendar day, including weekends and holidays. In the unfortunate event that you must submit late  work, place it in the drop boxes provided in room 225 of 725 Spadina Ave, using the time‐stamp  machine. Please note that these drop boxes are available during business hours only, and if you submit  work there, you must notify your TA that you have done so or it may not be retrieved.     Tests and Make‐up Tests: All students must write the test at the regularly scheduled sitting in class, or  at Accessibility Services with prior registration. Make‐up tests may be granted at the discretion of the  instructor, but are not guaranteed, to students who a) contact the instructor or a TA within three days of  the test and b) provide acceptable documentation at the time of the make‐up test.     Documentation: Requests to write a make‐up test or submit late work without penalty will be  considered only with appropriate documentation. This means a University of Toronto medical certificate  or, in cases where the situation is of a personal rather than medical nature, a letter from your registrar.      Regrading: Students may request a regrade of a written assignment or their short answers (if any) on a  test. Students must wait 24 hours after the paper or test is handed back before submitting a regrade  request, and must provide a written statement justifying why their paper should be reviewed. If the  instructor agrees that a paper or test should be reviewed, the new mark is final and may be higher or  lower than the original mark.      Academic Integrity: Students are expected to understand and follow the University of Toronto’s policies  regarding academic integrity. Cheating, misrepresentation, and plagiarism will not be tolerated, and will  result in serious penalties. Students must use proper citation practice, and know the difference between  acceptable and unacceptable paraphrasing of others’ work. If you are unfamiliar with academic integrity  at the University of Toronto, please visit www.utoronto.ca/academicintegrity. Margaret Proctor’s  document entitled “How Not to Plagarize,” available on the aforementioned website, is a particularly  recommended resource.      COURSE SCHEDULE AND REQUIRED READINGS  Many of your required readings are available electronically through the University of Toronto library  (marked with [JSTOR]). On the first day of class, I will demonstrate how to access electronic journals  through the library system. Other readings can be found in your course pack, which is available from the  University of Toronto bookstore at the Koffler Centre. Please do the required readings before the lecture.     September 12: What is the sociology of gender and why does it matter?   Required reading:    Poisson, Jayme. “Parents Keep Child’s Gender Secret.” Toronto Star, 21 May  2011. Available here.     Optional:   Any or all other articles from the Toronto Star discussion around the original  article, available at: http://www.thestar.com/topic/genderless%20baby     2      MODULE 1: How should we think about gender?    September 19: Decoupling gender from biology: Social Constructionist Approaches  Required Reading:   Kessler, Suzanne and Wendy McKenna. 1985. “The Primacy of Gender  Attribution” In Gender: An Ethnomethodological Approach [coursepack]  Fausto‐Sterling, Anne. 1993. “The Five Sexes: Why Male and Female Are Not  Enough.” The Sciences, 33: 2: 20‐25. [on Blackboard]  Dreger, Alice. 2009. “Science is forcing sp
More Less

Related notes for SOC265H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit