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CA (543,061)
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SOC336H1 (37)
Brasch (10)
Lecture

Discrimination & Disadvantage

4 Pages
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Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOC336H1
Professor
Brasch

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October 19 – Discrimination & Disadvantage
G&M: Merkels problem a lesson for Canada
Earning deficits – not all immigrant skills are used and they are being undervalued; it was not seen
initially as a big problem since workers were working their way up
Underutilization of immigrant skills
Any employment of immigrants in work below a level of skill at which they could function as
effectively as native-born Canadians
oOne form of employment discrimination
1996 census data
Annual earning deficit = $2.4 billion
Pay inequities = $12.6 billion
Forms of underutilization
1. Non-recognition of foreign professional or trade credentials by Canadian licensing bodies for
professions and trades (i.e. doctors, dentists, physiotherapist)forced to restart from square 1
2. Non-recognition of foreign professional or trade credential by employers, for immigrants who
have received Canadian licensesdifficulties being hired despite jumping through hoops
3. Non-recognition of foreign occupational credentials by employers in non-licensed occupational
fields
4. Discounting foreign-acquired skills (i.e. people skills, ability to manage/administer projects)
employers here dont recognize that skills picked up by immigrants are worthy of hiring (skills are
specific)
5. Non-recognition of general foreign education (i.e. worth of BA in Canada vs. Mexico)there are
degrees acquired overseas that do not exist in our society
6. Discounting foreign experienceyour experience does not equal Canadian experience”
7. All other negative employment decisions favouring Canadian-trained over foreign-trained workers
affecting hiring or promotion (i.e. after hiring, certain favourable treatments such as promotions,
networking opportunities etc)
Underutilization when
Skills held by the immigrant are equal (or greater) to Canadian standards
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Description
October 19 Discrimination & Disadvantage G&M: Merkels problem a lesson for Canada Earning deficits not all immigrant skills are used and they are being undervalued; it was not seen initially as a big problem since workers were working their way up Underutilization of immigrant skills Any employment of immigrants in work below a level of skill at which they could function as effectively as native-born Canadians o One form of employment discrimination 1996 census data Annual earning deficit = $2.4 billion Pay inequities = $12.6 billion Forms of underutilization 1. Non-recognition of foreign professional or trade credentials by Canadian licensing bodies for professions and trades (i.e. doctors, dentists, physiotherapist) forced to restart from square 1 2. Non-recognition of foreign professional or trade credential by employers, for immigrants who have received Canadian licenses difficulties being hired despite jumping through hoops 3. Non-recognition of foreign occupational credentials by employers in non-licensed occupational fields 4. Discounting foreign-acquired skills (i.e. people skills, ability to manageadminister projects) employers here dont recognize that skills picked up by immigrants are worthy of hiring (skills are specific) 5. Non-recognition of general foreign education (i.e. worth of BA in Canada vs. Mexico) there are degrees acquired overseas that do not exist in our society 6. Discounting foreign experience your experience does not equal Canadian experience 7. All other negative employment decisions favouring Canadian-trained over foreign-trained workers affecting hiring or promotion (i.e. after hiring, certain favourable treatments such as promotions, networking opportunities etc) Underutilization when Skills held by the immigrant are equal (or greater) to Canadian standards www.notesolution.com
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