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Lecture 8

ENGL 101 Lecture 8: note8.07


Department
English
Course Code
ENGL 101
Professor
Mac Leod Brock
Lecture
8

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Macmillan_BSM | Comparatives and Superlatives
INSTRUCTOR: Comparatives and Superlatives. We use the comparative and superlative forms of
adjectives and adverbs to compare things. Comparative modifiers are used to
compare two things. Comparative adjectives and adverbs usually end in er or are
used with the word more. This building is taller than that one. This store is more
crowded than that one. Keegan runs faster than Dylan. In all of these sentences,
two things are being compared.
Superlatives are used when comparing three or more things. Superlative adjectives
and adverbs usually end in est or are used with the word most. This is the tallest
building on the block. This is the most crowded store in the mall. Of all the students
at the track meet, Keegan ran the fastest. In all these sentences, three or more
things are being compared.
When forming most comparatives and superlatives, use the er or est ending or use
the word more or most. Use this chart is a guide. If you are forming the comparative
or superlative of good, bad, well, or badly, use the irregular forms better, best,
worse, and worst.
For all other adjectives and adverbs, apply these general rules. For most one
syllable words, such as hard and fast, add er or est. For most adverbs of more than
one syllable, use more or most. For most two syllable adjectives that end in y, such
as scary, or le such as simple, add er or est. For most other adjectives of more than
one syllable, use more or most.
The words more and most should not be used together with the er and est forms of
adjectives and adverbs. This laptop is the most heaviest I have tried. The word most
is redundant with heaviest, so it should be removed. This laptop is the heaviest I
have tried. With the word most omitted, this sentence is now correct. Here is
another example. Jayden sings more better then Devon. The word more is
redundant with better, so it should be removed. Jayden sings better than Devon.
With the word more omitted, the sentence is now correct.
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