Lecture 6.docx

7 Pages
46 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anatomy and Cell Biology
Course
Anatomy and Cell Biology 3319
Professor
Michele Barbeau
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 6 Basal Ganglia  26/09/13 Objectives: Identify the main structures Compare direct and indirect striopallidal pathways  What are the Basal Ganglia: They are located in the basal part of the forebrain at the telencephalon They are a cluster of neurons in the PNS (Ganglia)  A group of nuclei that act as functional unit Part of the deep gray matter in the forebrain Strong connections to the cerebral cortex and thalamus One of the most basic components in the forebrain that can be found in all vertebrates Where are the Basal Ganglia?: The cerebral cortex is the outside gray matter containing neuronal cell bodies The cerebral white matter is the deepest layer of white matter containing fibers connecting cell  bodies to other cortical areas and the rest of the brain Deep Gray Matter: is the basal ganglia, which is the deepest layer of large collection of  neuronal cell bodies  Why are the Basal Ganglia Important: They are responsible for voluntary movement control Selection and initiation of movement Coordination speed and strength of movements Procedural learning of routines/habits   Cognition  Emotion Estimation of time  1 ACB 3319 Lecture 6 Basal Ganglia  26/09/13 Components of the Basal Ganglia: The three main parts are the Caudate nucleous, putamen and globus pallidus Caudate Nucleus and Putamen make the Striatum The caudate nucleus arches over the thalamus  The substantia nigra also influences the activity of the basal ganglia 2 Lecture 6 Basal Ganglia  26/09/13 Frontal/Coronal Section: 3 ACB 3319 Lecture 6 Basal Ganglia  26/09/13 Horizontal Section: Basal Ganglia and their Role in Movement Control: Motor Control Hierarchy  1. Strategy and Goal association areas of the cortex  Pre­frontal Cortex Indeomotor Area Basal Ganglia 2. Tactics: sequence of muscle contraction motor cortex premotor cortex cerebellum 3. Execution: activation of motor neurons brainstem spinal cord (spinal reflexes) 4 Lecture 6 Basal Ganglia  26/09/13 The Striopallidal Pathways: Information from the cortex (association and sensory areas) travel through the thalamus to  innervate motor areas which cause movement  The thalamus is always active thus you need GPi to create a toxic substance that inhibits the  thalamus  The simple way to make the thalamus active to affect motor areas is to receive a signal from the  cortex and SNc which goes to the Stratium which goes to the GPi and inactives its function thus  no toxic inhibition can be produced so the thalamus is active and motor areas can be innervated The active STN can also be used to activate the GPi 
More Less

Related notes for Anatomy and Cell Biology 3319

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit