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Lecture 6

Anthropology 1027A/B Lecture Notes - Lecture 6: English Compound, Mortlockese Language, Suppletion


Department
Anthropology
Course Code
ANTH 1027A/B
Professor
Tania Granadillo
Lecture
6

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Anthropology 1027A: Lecture 6 Tuesday October 18th, 2016
Morphology: Part Two
Morphology: Part Two
Tuesday October 18th, 2016
Word Formation Process
Affixation
Derivations and inflections
Internal change
Suppletion
Reduplication
Conversion
Clipping
Blending
Backformation
Acronyms
Initialism
Coinage
Eponyms
Compounding
A compound word contains two or more roots
May be same or different lexical categories
Ex. blackboard, streetlight, stirfry
Ex. Portuguese:
Sobremesa =
over + table = ‘dessert’
Porta retrato
= carry + portrait = ‘picture frame’
Compound words are made of constituent morphemes
The constituent that determines the category of the entire word is the head
Languages can have left-headed or right-headed compounds
English compounds are primarily right-headed
Ex. N + V = V (spoonfeed)
Other properties of compounds:
The first constituent of an English compound is often stressed; phrases have final stress
Ex. Whitehouse vs. whitehouse
Plural and tense affixes are normally not attached to the non-head of the compound
Ex. shoebox or shoeboxes vs. shoesbox
When the first constituent of a compound is an adjective, it cannot be modified by ‘very’
Ex. a very green house vs a very greenhouse
Morphological Analysis in Other Languages
Identify recurring strings of sounds and match them with recurring meanings.
Things to keep in mind:
Do not assume the morpheme order is the same as in English
Do not assume every English contrast is represented in the language
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