Class Notes (837,449)
Canada (510,273)
Anthropology (869)
Lecture

Biological Anthro1020E NOTES.docx

24 Pages
70 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anthropology
Course
Anthropology 1020E
Professor
Christopher Ellis
Semester
Winter

Description
Intro 01/08/2013 Jan 8, 2013 Anthropologists are interested in answering big questions that go beyond specific things of particular groups  of people How are humans distinct…what sets us apart from other species? ­ Language ­ Abstract and complex thought ­ Split brain functioning (although one species of bird and one of frog have the same capability) ­ Symbols (we assigned meanings to symbols in our life and have agreed upon them)…we also categorize  things ­ Technological capabilities…Tool use ­ Can control our environment ­ Pre selection ­ Progress ­ Concept of time ­ Hairless hence we wear clothes for protection ­ Brain size…large brains vs. body size ­ Bipedalism: we  have free hand hands and opposable thumbs. This means we have a ‘precision grip’ ­ We have a self­consciousness and self­awareness ­ Sexual division of labour ­ Pronounced mammary glands The History of the Development of Anthro 01/08/2013 Jan 15 The History of the Development of Anthro 01/08/2013 Historic archaeologists Prehistoric archaeologists Prehistory: time before written records (99%+ of human existence). The history background of biological change and evolution History intertwined with idea of “cultural evolution” as both rely on insights and principles derived from  geology. Also, early investigators were not always clear on the distinction between biologically (genetic) derived  change and culturally (non­genetic) change; some seem to imply customs were inherited genetically. Nonetheless, focus on biological/physical change and history here Discovery of new and different peoples (European exploration)…the big question...where did they come  from? Classical literature and Bible provided no answers A major roadblock to understanding this: he earth was very young The History of the Development of Anthro 01/08/2013 Archbishop Ussher (A.D. 1650): said the earth was created in 4004 B.C. or about 6000 years ago. Geology scholars began to question such estimates Two major insights Insight #1 ­ earth preserved record of past into which one could “breathe history” ­ Nicolas Steno = Steno’s law or the “law of superposition” = deeper layers/strata are older than  overlying ones(ones at top);  Insight #2 ­ “Law of uniformitarianism” ­ James Hutton and Charles Lyell ­ Forces forming earth same today as in past ­ Slow process (e.g erosion) = earth very old (has to be much older than 6000) Living Things: The History of the Development of Anthro 01/08/2013 ­ George Cuvier (French Naturalist) ­ He and others showed: a) that there were many extinct form of animals b) that each layer contained a different set of species indicating change over time. ­ Cuvier believed in  “immutability” of species ­ “catastrophism” : life destroyed by series of catastrophes of which biblical flood was only one and  life created anew ­ Charles Darmin (1859( “On the Origin of Species” = natural selection ­ this is a slow process that fit with what the geological data and insights on the slow processes of  the earth’s processes ­ Darwin did not discuss humans ­ Widespread acceptance: human fossils of non­modern form (“homininds” by 1900, Neandertals, etc DARWIN EVOLUTION ­ late 1700s = transmutation ­ what was mechanism? ­ Jean Baptiste de Lamarck (French naturalist), he had 2 ideas: ­ 1) change is a product of interaction of organisms and their environment (e.g. adaptation) ­ 2) mechanism for change 01/08/2013 Jan 17 th Darwin and Alfred Russell Wallace: ­ agree with Lamarck: evolution due to environmental adaptation = why change occurs ­ disagree: how change occurs Darwin on How Change occurs: Main Principles 1) reproductive rate ­ Thomas Malthus: high mortality rate of young ­ they die off before they can reproduce: “struggle for existence” 2) VARIATION IN populations ­ we are all different (with the exception of twins for e.g_ 3) natural selection ­ those that can survive the variants which are more adaptive in the environment Lamarck’s view: That we acquired a particular trait 01/08/2013 Darwin’s view: That these traits already exist in variation 4) survive and reproduce selection by environment = some variants survive and are reproduced Note:  ­Natural selection is not “goal­oriented” therefore can always envision better solutions to adaptive problems. i.e. not a perfect  solution for e.g the eye is a marvel but there are many defects in humans for e.g ppl have to wear glasses or end up getting other  eye defects ­ cannot create variation, it only “edits” it and works with what already exists in the environment ­ human can be goal oriented. This is “artificial selection” which Darwin took up from he was a teen living on a farm. E.g. if  animals that can be artificially selected: race horses, dogs, etc ­  many modern examples of evolutionary change: due to selective factors in the environment e.g. insect pests and insecticides e.g peppered moth in England during the Industrial Rev. the white moths were much more common, black ones were rare. The  white moths were favoured and dominant because they were camouflaged on the trees…after the Rev, the trees bark were  blackened and the black ones were now able to “fit in” whereas the white one stood out now. Eventually the black ones were  more common and white moths were rare. This is a change due to environmental factors ­ as put forward by Darwin, “Darwinian Evolution” not complete ­ had idea how it worked but underlying mechanisms not known 01/08/2013 ­ Darwin’s time = children “blends” of parents so how could useful traits be passed on+ would be “watered down” ­ mechanisms major research focus since Darwin’s time was only enhanced ideas ­ since Darwin’s time, we’ve had a combination of knowledge of mechanism (genetics) and Darwin’s model = Model Synthesis” Genes & Genetics: the basics ­ main units of heredity in cells = chromosomes (coloured bodies) ­ humans have = 46 chromosomes (or 23 pairs) …one from the mother; one from the father ­ chromosomes made up of genes at different loci: control physical/ biological traits ­ genes made up of DNA = building blocks of life ­ gene control of traits highly complex; some cases many genes in combination influence trait ­ monogenic vs. polygenic­ total set of genes in chromosomes of bearer = genotype Hierarchical Structure Genotype (total set of genes)          | Chromosomes 01/08/2013          | Genes at various loci (locations)          | DNA ( molecule containing genetic code) and associated proteins  ­ are exceptions but most genes …. ­ even tho in pairs can be of different forms or specify different variants, eye colour, hair colour, etc ­ diff forms of gene at same loci on chromosome = alleles ­ not all alleles necessarily expressed physically ­ distinguished genotype (genetic complement) from phenotype (physical complement) ­ why physical expression differ? = Austrian Monk, Gregor Mendel, late 1800s= pea plants ­ simple human example = controlled by one pair of genes ­ also: there are only 2 alleles/ forms of gene Sickle cell Anemia 01/08/2013 ­ “sickling” of blood cells = oxygen shortages ­ the blood cell is a moon shaped as opposed to a full circular one, hence less oxygen is carried ­ only 2 possible forms of te gene or 2 diff alleles 1) Allele A = absence of sickle cell 2) Allele B = presence of sickle cell ­ from mother and father = several potential combinations = refer to “Punnett Square” Homozygous: AA= no sickle cell BB= sickle cell Heterzygous: AB= no/little sickle cell A = “dominant”  B = “recesive” 01/08/2013 Jan 22 01/08/2013 ­ induced by environmental factors called “mutagens” e.g. cosmic rays ­ most are “deleterious” = bad ­ some “neutral” = no good or bad effects ­ some, very small number = “advantageous” = increase survival and reproduction ­ since purely due to chance = can always envisage better solution to adaptive problems 2) sexual reproductio
More Less

Related notes for Anthropology 1020E

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit