Class Notes (838,403)
Canada (510,881)
Biology (6,824)
Prof (12)
Lecture 4

Lecture 4 – Gene and Genome Structure.docx

6 Pages
42 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
Biology 2581B
Professor
Prof
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 4 – Gene and Genome Structure DNA: Information Storage and Retrieval DNA stores the biological information to create a diverse range of: Proteins  ▯Cell types  ▯Tissues  ▯Organisms Advantages: • Ease of storage (large quantity of data) • Can be copied reliably DNA Stores Information “Digitally” in A, C, T, G Analogous to storing electronic data such as music as digitized  information on your computer hard drive Central Dogma of Molecular Biology and Genetics We have DNA – information storage that is self­replicating –  that can be transcribed as an RNA molecule. So we can take pieces of it, make copies and shove them out of  the nucleus to make proteins The Flow of Information in Biological Systems Information flows from DNA to RNA to protein DNA – read in two orders; one strand is 5’­3’  directionally, the other strand will be antiparallel to that.  The 5’­3’ is what will encode the RNA RNA – will transcribe an amino acid where the N­ terminus is the beginning (corresponds to 5’) and the  other end is the C­terminus (3’) The Central Dogma of Molecular Biology and Genetics Circa 2012 We can look at the entire genome at multiple levels We can also look at the whole transcriptome – all the genes that are being expressed in a  given tissue at a given time We can also look at the proteome – proteins in a cell at a given  time What we want to find out is how it affects the phenotype The combined power of DNA sequencers, computers, and DNA  synthesizers make it possible to interpret, store, replicate, and  transmit genetic information electronically from one place to  another anywhere on the planet What is a Gene? • Basic unit of biological information • A specific segment of DNA at a specific location in the genome (on a region of a  chromosome) that serves as a unit of function • Encodes RNA or protein Anatomy of a Eukaryotic Gene These are consensus regions – present in most genes but not all They are important for basic transcription machinery (GC box, CAAT box, TATA box) 5’ UTR – untranslated region The protein stops at the stop codon, the but RNA stops after the Poly­A site. The dark  green region encodes the actual protein. Eukaryotes have introns – they usually have  consensus sequences at the beginning and end  of them called recognition sites so that  restriction enzymes can cut them out of the  RNA First, you will get transcription – starting at 5’  UTR site and ends at the Poly adenylation  signal Once transcribed it must be processed to a  mature RNA which has the introns spliced  out and has RNA stabilizing mechanisms –  we don’t like single stranded molecules  because they are so unstable so we add a 5’  cap and a PolyA tail so that it is not  degraded The mature mRNA is then shuttled out onto  the ribosome and it is read from the 5’UTR  to the stop codon to form the protein, which  is then shuttled where it needs to go. Anatomy of a Eukaryotic Gene Coding Strand is identical to the RNA strand except for uracil and thyamine Non­coding Strand is the template Rather than trying to mimic the coding strand you can just pretend you are building new  DNA using the basis of complementarity – the template strand is not coding for the gene  but it is used to build the RNA RNA has the capacity to store, replicate, mutate, and  express information; like proteins. RNA can fold in three  dimensions to produce molecules capable of  catalyzing the chemistry of life. RNA is very unstable Genes Between Species – vary considerably You have a lot of intronic information being taken out as well as exons being removed by  differential splicing In any given tissue where dystrophin is expressed you could have any variation of the  exons taken out and you can have multiple promoters determining where it will be  expressed It is often possible to place a gene from one organism into the genome of a very different  organism and see it function normally in the new environment Sequence to Function Open Reading Frame (ORF) – in­frame sequence of DNA that starts with start codon  (ATG) and ends with any of the three termination (STOP) codons (TAA, TAG, TGA) Coding Sequence (CDS) – region of DNA that is translated to form proteins The ORF is easy to find in things like bacteria but a little harder to find in eukaryotes  with introns and alternate splicing The Genetic Code There is redundancy in the genetic code – evolutionary variation.  Different species like to use different cod
More Less

Related notes for Biology 2581B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit