Class Notes (837,998)
Canada (510,614)
Biology (6,824)
Prof (12)
Lecture 6

Lecture 6 – Linkage, recombination and mapping.docx

8 Pages
50 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
Biology 2581B
Professor
Prof
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 6 – Linkage, Recombination, and Mapping January 29, 2014 Recombination­ sorting of alleles into  new combinations and is within the  realm of Mendelian genetics Recombinant Progeny­ can result in  either of two ways: 1. Recombination of genes on the  same chromosome during  gamete formation 2. Independent assortment of genes  on non­homologous  chromosomes Females­ carry two X chromosomes, and thus have two alleles for each sex linked gene Males­ have only one X chromosome­from female parent­and thus only a single allele  for each of these genes Syntenic­two genes located on the same chromosome. Genetic Linkage­ genes that travel together more often than not exhibit this and it is in  violation of Mendel’s law of independent assortment You would expect a ratio of 1:1:1:1 in a dihybrid cross. Parental Types­ expected to be half of the gametes, carrying either the allele combination  of the original female of the P generation or the allele combination of the original male Recombinant Types­ expected to be the other half of the gametes; reshuffling will  produce the two allele combinations  not seen in the P generation parents  of the F   1 You have a dihybrid parent being crossed with  a homozygous recessive parent­ this is a test  cross You expect four different types of progeny in equal proportions, but there is a  discrepancy. The Chi­Square test show whether the deviations from the expected 1:1:1:1 phenotypic  ratio are due to sampling error or not. Our P value is less than 0.005, so the likelihood that this is due to sampling error is very  low. Now we must figure out what biological information there is for this­ but first repeat the  experiment! A second trial with phenotypically identical  parents gives converse phenotypic ratios in the  progeny. What genotypic differences could  account for these results? Critical Questions: 1. What is the genetic basis for the  deviation from the expected 1:1:1:1  ratio? 2. Why is there an excess of AaBb and  aabb flies (and a deficiency of Aabb and  aaBb flies) in some trials, while in others  this pattern is reversed? This is linkage notation On top of the line is the arrangement of the  alleles on one chromosome of the homologous  pair Under the link is the arrangement on the other  chromosome of the homologous pair So one combination has undergone crossing  over Two genes are considered linked when the  number of F  2rogeny with parental genotypes  exceeds the number of F  p2ogeny with  recombinant genotypes The parental combinations of alleles do travel  together more often than not, but depending on how tight the linkage is it can be to  different degrees. So, if the numbers of parental­type and recombinant­type gametes are equal, then the two  genes are assorting independently. If the parental­type gametes exceed the recombinant  form, then the genes are linked. Researchers have never observed statistically significant recombination frequencies  between two genes greater than 50%, which means that in any cross following two genes,  recombinant types are never in majority. Crossing Over­between two nearby loci on the same  chromosome provides an alternate mechanism of deriving  recombinants. It is the physical exchange of the chromosome  arms Recombination results from  reciprocal exchanges between  homologous chromosomes  during prophase of meiosis I. In this case there are two cross  overs, resulting in the flipping  of the arms and you get two  recombinant chromosomes Synaptonemal Complex­  aligns homologous chromosomes It’s thought to act like a  zipper. You see two lateral  elements and two transverse  elements going up and down­  it is thought that they zip the  chromosome together. The red circles are  recombination nodules­  their number and location  correspond to where you see  crossing over later on in the  process, but their  mechanisms isnt well  understood Barbra McClintock, Harriet Creighton, and Curt Stern demonstrated that recombination  could result from reciprocal exchanges between homologous chromosomes • One X chromosome carried mutations producing carnation eyes (car) that were  kidney shaped (Bar) and was marked physically by a visible discontinuity, which  resulted when the end of the X  chromosome was broken off and  attached to an autosome • Other X chromosome had wild­ type alleles (+) for both car and  Bar genes, and its physical marker  consisted of part of the Y  chromosome that had becom  connected to the X­choromosome  centromere • When there was crossing over you  could so that the one chromosome  would then have both the discontinuity and the part Y while the other  chromosome was completely normal. Our genetic crosses described in linkage notation Recombination may not be as  common for som
More Less

Related notes for Biology 2581B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit