Class Notes (837,484)
Canada (510,274)
Biology (6,824)
Prof (12)
Lecture 10

Lecture 10 – Mapping and Genome Sequencing.docx

7 Pages
72 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
Biology 2581B
Professor
Prof
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 10 – Mapping and Genome Sequencing Positional Cloning­ finding the chromosomal location of a gene based on its phenotype Finding a gene sequence based on its phenotype can be done with and without mapping  information Hemophilia A­ no mapping information Cystic Fibrosis­ mapping information was needed Hemophilia and Colorblindness Hemophilia A “Old” interest: famous historical example “New” interest: • Hemophilia patients received untested and unscreened clotting factor prior to  1992 • Extreme risk for contracting HIV and hepatitis C • Estimated that more than 50% of the hemophilia population contracted HIV from  the tainted blood supply in the US alone One can clone a gene without mapping information IF one has: • Family history o Hemophilia is a X­linked, recessive, single  • An idea of what is causing the mutation o A clotting factor­ a mutation that inactivates this factor causes hemophilia  A Blood Clotting Cascade Hemophilia A Cloning • Protein sequencing – often only a small portion is identified • Done by computer – remember that not all amino acids are encoded by a single  codon wobble position • Degenerate – mixture of similar, but not identical sequences • Probe library with the oligonucleotides and obtain genomic clones of the gene –  human genomic DNA library Genomic Library Each on contains a vector, but each vector may  have a different sequence – now we want to find  the sequence that matches the probe we have Colony Hybridization • Making an imprint on velvet and  then putting them on a new plate • We can bust a cell and the DNA will  be stuck to the membrane wherever  the colony was • Take the membrane, expose it to a probe, and put a film on it • We are looking for the colonies on the autoradiogram – wherever it lights up is  where the colony is Positional Cloning of Hemophilia A Found it was a complicated gene: 186 kb long­  contains 26 exons Hemophilia A Cloning To confirm that they had the correct gene, the  gene was sequenced from patients having  hemophilia A. In each case mutations were identified: • Base substitutions • Splice mutations • Small deletions • Large deletions Cystic Fibrosis • Recessive autosomal gene – frequency of unaffected carriers in the population is  much greater • 1/2500 children are born with it of European descent • Many different symptoms o Viscous secretion in lungs, pancreas, sweat glands, salty­tasting skin,  appetite but poor growth, coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, lung  infections • Most patients die before the age of 30 Researchers had no idea what the function of the gene was­ 100’s of genes are required  for secretion and most were unknown in the 1980s Positional Cloning of Cystic Fibrosis • It was cloned with mapping information • Built a linkage map to a known sequence • Used chromosome walking and chromosome jumping to get the CF gene (narrow  down where the locus is) Linkage Maps­ constructed from two or three point crosses with overlapping sets of loci  and you can depict the distances between loci as well as the order in which they occur on  a chromosome Use of SNPs and other polymorphic DNA markers can help map loci in a single cross or  extended human family If a genetic linkage can be found between a disease trait and one or more previously  mapped DNA markers, then the gene responsible for the trait must lie in the same sub  chromosomal region as those DNA markers. Because the human genome is sequenced, you know the chromosomal positions of all  DNA markers. You don’t know the position of the disease locus. Mapping to a Close Known Sequence This shows four markers – M1, M2, M3, M4 – used in  the linkage analysis of a disease phenotype. These  provide “linkage coverage” of a portion of the  chromosome. This suggests the gene responsible for the  disease lies between those markers You could type additional markers that lie between M1  and M2 to position the disease locus with higher  resolution. They narrowed it down to a stretch­ but the  stretch was still very big. There is a stretch of DNA with genes­ one is a gene of  interest and we want to know how close the marker is  to the gene and how often the marker is inherited with  the gene Looking for candidate genes. Analysis of the region  between recombination sites that define the smallest  area within which the disease locus can lie should  reveal the presence of candidate genes. Finding the correct candi
More Less

Related notes for Biology 2581B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit