Class Notes (834,934)
Canada (508,830)
English (1,178)
English 2017 (147)
Lecture

Lecture 22.docx

8 Pages
67 Views
Unlock Document

Department
English
Course
English 2017
Professor
Nigel Joseph
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 22 11/25/2013 • She suggests there’s something else at work here  • She links it back to childhood by saying that a hypothetical viewer at a film is like a child,  subjects to a mirror state – sees that image in the mirror as whole All its life the child desires that image • • The anxiety created by the female image she goes back to Frued’s castration anxiety – the feeling of  fear and awkwardness that the women cannot possess the penis • The core of her argument is how this anxiety is dealt with by different film makers and the  viewer • “Destruction of pleasure ..” • she says if women are to escape the bonds of patriarchy they work to destroy our pleasure in  film  • she says film is deeply pleasurable  • She says that obsessiveness is precisely what has to be broken down, that’s what keeps  women attractive  “This article will discuss the interweaving of that erotic pleasure in film, its meaning and its  • central place of women, it says that analyzing pleasure or beauty destroys it that is the point of  the article”  • Especially women but also men should critique their pleasure • “Satisfaction and reinforcement of the ego…” • She seems to be really aggressive about this pleasure should be completely destroyed • It is possible to replace it with a different pleasure maybe but she is saying no you cant • Basic idea to this essay – we feel pleasure by looking – scopophilia  • Has nothing to do with eroticism  • In it’s roots the pleasure in looking is pure, unconnected with libido • Freud associates this especially with children  Their voyeuristic activities to see the private and forbidden • • Children are profoundly interested in anatomical differences • He says they see sexuality as something very damaging to the mother  o Children see the mother as being wounded or hurt during sex • She makes distinction between scopophilia and perversion • Scopophilia is natural and more or less accepted by society • The classic image of a voyeur is usually an older man watching a younger women  • It is clearly an activity not approved of by society, it is a criminal act and yet she suggests that  watching  film is a form of voyeurism that is sanctioned by society • “What is seen on the screen is manifestly shown But the mass of mainstream film and the conventions  within which it has consciously evolved portray a hermetically sealed world which unwinds magically in  different presence of the audience producing for them a sense of separation and playing on their  fantasy” • “Darkness of the theatre  • Film is really being shown but there to be seen, illusion of looking into the private world  • Projection of repressed desire onto the performer” • In the theatre it’s quiet, you’re not supposed to make noise or talk to each other – you’re  repressed  • You’re not supposed to do anything in response to the film  o Not screaming in horror films  • You are repressed as a member of the audience and you’re watching something on the screen  lit up which is also very intimate  o Seen in Hitchcock – you see a city camera moves closer to a building and goes to a  window and into the window and you see a couple having an adulterous affair  o Mulvey and others choose Hitchcock because he’s one of the first to make this link  between film and voyeurism   We want to watch other people but we are not allowed too, film gives us this  opportunity  • “Lacount has described how the moment when a child recognizes its own image in the mirror…  misrecognition as superior projects this body outside itself”  • Theory of the mirror stage  • Suggests that desire is created very early and desires completeness and perfection • Our lack of power over our bodies or motor skills • Makes the link between this and film – if you’re sitting watching a film clearly you’re a b it like  the child looking into the mirror • The people in the film are desirable and we cannot have that • Interesting point about Mulvey has to do with our new habits of watching, she’s writing at a time  when families went to a theatre to watch together now most people watch everything at home  and don’t watch continuously. This is a large deviation from Mulvey’s thesis o If everyone’s watching films differently what happens to the idea of voyeurism, are we  less voyeuristic or more because we are doing it in the privacy of our bedrooms and no  one can see us  • “apart from extraneous similarities between film and mirror the cinema has structures of fascination  strong enough to allow temporary loss of ego while simultaneously reinforcing it” • You identify with that person on the screen  • “Cinema has distinguished itself in the production of ego ideals through the star system for instance,  stars provide focus or center both to the screen space and screen story where they act out a complex  process of likeness and difference the glamorous impersonates the ordinary..”  •  “Scopophilia arises from pleasure in using another person as object… object on the screen”  • When you’re watching a film there’s to processes taking place simultaneously • 1. Separating yourself from the screen to use it as object of pleasure 2. Identifying with what’s  happening on the screen • Man watching a women – see women as object of desire but then identifying as the man  • “In a world ordered by sexual imbalance, pleasure in looking is split between active male and passive  female …  constitute to be looked at ness”  • She suggests that this is what it means to be a women, women’s destiny is tied in with being  looked at  • Slightly depressing for women – can never escape this objectifying erotic look  o Always being looked at by men and also by women as erotic, criticized for not coming  up to certain norms o Lose out in professional status • As long as films remain intact women’s status will not change – her argument  • She says every time you watch a film like this you unconsciously absorb the pattern of looking  and women’s situation wont change unless we change that • “An active­ passive heterosexual division of labour has similarly controlled narrative structure… male  figure cannot bear the burden of sexual objectification “ • Women become focus of gaze and men not looked at push the narrative forward, they are  always energetic, imaginative  • “Man controls film strategy and also emerges as representative of power in a further sense: as  the bearer of the look of the spectator, transferring t behind the screen to neutralise the extra 
More Less

Related notes for English 2017

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit