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Lecture 2

Geography 2011A/B Lecture 2: Lecture 2
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3 Pages
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Department
Geography
Course Code
Geography 2011A/B
Professor
Wendy Dickinson

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Lecture 2.1 Social Geography
Questions to think about…
1. Who are we?
2. Where do we live? (trends)
3. What drive pop. growth?
4. What are the impacts of pop. increases and decreases?
Early Ontario
- Natives arrived about 10,000 years ago
- Boom of 60,000 to 117,000 in 1500s
- Different tribes were in different locations (heterogeneous); the closer they were to the Great Lakes
the more they dealt with agriculture
- In 1500s Europeans came looking for passage to the Orient Natives showed them the Great Lakes
so they thought that they could Settled Fur Trade (1600s) French and English battle for
domination
- In 1787 the US Ordinance (military) developed in the Great Lakes because the US wanted the
resources; 1791 saw Upper Canada become defined with 17,000 people
- 1812 was the last battle for the Great Lakes
- Confederation in 1867
Population Growth
- Growth has always been driven by immigration, more than any other province
- Immigrants are attracted to already settled groups, job opportunities, and a generally more
prosperous society
- In early 1900s the population lived 50/50 urban and rural, then Ford plant came in 1904 and
urbanization began; cheap resources in Canada with market in the US, power of falls harnessed for
hydro electricity
- One million immigrants came between 1911 and 1913, most to Ontario
- Currently Ontario is 38.8% of Canada’s population and held half of the growth since 2001 =
centralization = power
- More visible minorities (50%+) because of immigration = diversification of mother tongue
- Immigrants tend to go to larger cities = concentration of growth, will continue
- Those who fall under “dependent” classification is on the rise = change in demand of products and
services, and therefore jobs
- 92% of population lives in Southern Ontario, GTA has biggest growth
- Poor health care and high birth rates = reserves in North
Greater Golden Horseshoe
- Home to 2/3 of Ontario, ¼ and almost 1/3 of Canada (POWER)
- Population grew by 600,000 from 2001 to 2006
- Growth rate of 8.4% > Ontario at 6.6%
- Brampton tops charts
- Fairly equal gender ratio
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Description
Lecture 2.1 Social Geography Questions to think about 1. Who are we? 2. Where do we live? (trends) 3. What drive pop. growth? 4. What are the impacts of pop. increases and decreases? Early Ontario Natives arrived about 10,000 years ago Boom of 60,000 to 117,000 in 1500s Different tribes were in different locations (heterogeneous); the closer they were to the Great Lakes the more they dealt with agriculture In 1500s Europeans came looking for passage to the Orient Natives showed them the Great Lakes so they thought that they could Settled Fur Trade (1600s) French and English battle for domination In 1787 the US Ordinance (military) developed in the Great Lakes because the US wanted the resources; 1791 saw Upper Canada become defined with 17,000 people 1812 was the last battle for the Great Lakes Confederation in 1867 Population Growth Growth has always been driven by immigration, more than any other province Immigrants are attracted to already settled groups, job opportunities, and a generally more prosperous society In early 1900s the population lived 5050 urban and rural, then Ford plant came in 1904 and urbanization began; cheap resources in Canada with market in the US, power of falls harnessed for hydro electricity One million immigrants came between 1911 and 1913, most to Ontario Currently Ontario is 38.8 of Canadas population and held half of the growth since 2001 = centralization = power More visible minorities (50+) because of immigration = diversification of mother tongue Immigrants tend to go to larger cities = concentration of growth, will continue Those who fall under dependent classification is on the rise = change in demand of products and services, and therefore jobs 92 of population lives in Southern Ontario, GTA has biggest growth Poor health care and high birth rates = reserves in North Greater Golden Horseshoe Home to 23 of Ontario, and almost 13 of Canada (POWER) Population grew by 600,000 from 2001 to 2006 Growth rate of 8.4 > Ontario at 6.6 Brampton tops charts Fairly equal gender ratio
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