Class Notes (835,798)
Canada (509,410)
Geography (1,355)
P.J.Stooke (12)
Lecture 5

Lecture 5 - Geography of the Solar System.docx

5 Pages
66 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Geography
Course
Geography 2090A/B
Professor
P.J.Stooke
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 5 ­ Geography of the Solar System Sun • The central mass which holds the Solar System together and provides us with  warmth and light • The sun, a fairly average star, produces power by converting hydrogen to helium o It will do so for several billion years more, gradually becoming warmer o Some projections suggest it will become too warm for comfortable life on  Earth in a billion years or so • The sun ejects sub­atomic particles which stream out through the solar system, the  'solar wind'; These produce the aurora (northern lights) on Earth • Larger solar flares disrupt communications and power grids, damage satellites,  and could kill unprotected astronauts • The sun is thus both a natural resource and a potential hazard Planets • The sun is orbited by nine planets…Or is it eight? • The definition of 'planet' was traditional until recentlyThe word had no exact  meaning but implied that the object orbited a star and was quite large, but not a  star itself o In 2006 astronomers tried to create a new definition, but there is  widespread dissatisfaction with the result; The reason: an object larger  than Pluto was discovered. Is it a new planet?  • Planets include mid­sized rocky worlds (Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars) and giant  gas planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune) • Smaller worlds like Pluto, usually mixtures of ice and rock about 1000 to 2000  km across, are now called "dwarf planets" • Smaller things are still called asteroids or comets • Every planet is unique, presenting different versions of geology and/or  meteorology • Planets are now being discovered around other stars, a thousand or more already  Moons (satellites) • A satellite (= a moon) orbits a planet rather than a star • Satellites are found in all sizes up to 5000 km across, which is bigger than Pluto  and about the size of Mercury • The only difference between small planets and large moons is what they happen  to orbit: a star or a planet • Satellites may be rocky (moons of Earth and Mars) or icy (moons of Saturn) or a  mixture of the two • Some are geologically active, with volcanoes and fractured surfaces o  Io  (a moon of Jupiter) has dozens of active volcanoes o  Europa   (a moon of Jupiter) seems to have a liquid ocean under its smooth  icy surface o  Titan  (a moon of Saturn) has a thick hazy atmosphere, and lakes of liquid  methane at its poles o  Enceladus   (moon of Saturn) emits jets of water vapour from warm vents at  its south pole o  Triton  (a moon of Neptune) has an atmosphere and gas­jets erupting from  its surface • All four gas giant planets have rings made of billions of small particles; Each  particle is a tiny moon, and there is no exact dividing line between a moon and a  ring particle, no lower size limit to help define a moon Asteroids • Asteroids are also called 'minor planets' ­ they are just small planets orbiting the  sun • Most orbit in a broad belt between Mars and Jupiter, but others are found between  the planets or crossing planetary orbits • Some come close to Earth ­ the NEOs (Near­Earth Objects) • An asteroid whose orbit crosses a planet's orbit will eventually hit it or be  deflected by the planet's gravity o The collision forms a crater ­ that's why many worlds are covered with  craters o Deflected asteroids either fall into the sun, escape from the solar system,  or end up in another planet­crossing orbit which just delays their fate • Although Earth has never experienced a serious asteroid impact during the human  historical period, impacts are inevitable o We are just beginning to plan how to prevent such collisions in the future • Asteroids are not just hazards ­ they also may contain valuable resources for  future space developments Comets • Comets are seen in the night sky as a smeared or fuzzy light among the stars • We are seeing a cloud of gas and dust being blown off a small icy world (the  nucleus of the comet) as its ice evaporates o These small icy worlds are in effect just ice­rich asteroids ­ there is no  sharp division between comets and asteroids • Comets can hit a planet to make a crater, and also provide water, carbon  compounds or other resources to future space travellers Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud • The Kuiper Belt is a zone outside the orbits of the main planets where numerous  ice­rich asteroids or comets orbit o They are probably left over from the formation of the larger planets • Pluto was considered the largest of the 'Kuiper­Belt Objects' (KBOs), but other  KBOs as big as Pluto or bigger are being found now • Some people have suggested there might be big planets far out in or beyond the  Kuiper Belt, but nothing has been seen despite years of searching • The Oort Cloud is a huge spherical cloud of comets surrounding the sun,  extending out a good way towards nearby stars o The inner parts of the Oort Cloud merge with the Kuiper Belt  Orbits • Gravity determines orbits • An orbit is the path one object follows in space as a result of its current velocity  and the gravity it experiences • Orbits are ellipses unless they are disturbed by the gravity of another object or by  using a rocket • An object moves faster when experiencing a stronger gravitational attraction (for  instance when closer to the object it is orbiting) • A typical satellite in Low Earth Orbit (say 250 km high) takes about 90 minutes to  circle the Earth, whereas the Moon, 400,000 km out, takes a month  • It takes a lot of energy to get off Earth's surface and into orbit, and a lot of energy  to change the plane of an orbit • The most efficient way to travel from one orbit to 
More Less

Related notes for Geography 2090A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit