Class Notes (838,403)
Canada (510,881)
Geography (1,356)
Prof (7)
Lecture 10

Geography of Hazards 2152F Lecture 10.docx

6 Pages
88 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Geography
Course
Geography 2152F/G
Professor
Prof
Semester
Fall

Description
Geography of Hazards 2152F Lecture 10 Wildfires ­ Wildfire dates to the time when trees first evolved 350 million years ago ­ Many fires start naturally as result of lightning or volcanic eruptions ­ After a fire, vegetation completes a cycle from early colonizing plants to mature  ecosystem ­ The ecosystem that evolves adapts to the climate at that particular location and  particular time Adaptation to Wildfires • Many species have evolved to withstand fire or promote the life of the species  after a fire event • Examples: o Oak and redwood trees have bark that resists fire damage o Some pine trees have seeds that only open after a fire Wildfires Through History ­ The geologic record shows an increase in the amount of charcoal in sediment  beginning approximately 10,000 years ago ­ This suggests high amounts of wildfire activity at the time. Why might there be  more fire activity? o A warmer and/or drier climate o Increased use of fire by humans for clearing land and for heat, cooking,  etc. Elements of Wildfires • Wildfire requires three elements: fuel, oxygen and heat. If any of these are lost,  the fire will dissipate • Plants accumulate carbon dioxide and store carbon in their tissues • During a wildfire, this carbon dioxide is released back into the atmosphere • There are 3 phases to a wildfire: pre­ignition, combustion and extinction Pre­Ignition Phase Pre­heating ­ During this phase, vegetation reaches a temperature at which it can ignite ­ As vegetation is heated, it often loses water Pyrolysis ­ This is a chemical process describing the degradation of large hydrocarbon  molecules into smaller ones ­ The process occurs in the presence of heat (i.e. from heat radiating off of nearby  flames) Combustion Phase ­ The two processes of pre­heating and pyrolysis result in fuel that is prone to ignite ­ The combustion phase begins with ignition ­ Ignition is not a single process, but occurs repeatedly as the fore moves ­ Not all ignitions will result in a wildfire (the vegetation must be dry) Types of Combustion ­ Flaming combustion is the rapid, high temperature conversion of fuel into heat ­ It is characterized by flames and large amounts of unburned material ­ Smoldering combustion occurs in areas with burned material and ash that covers  new fuel Transfers of Heat • As a wildfire moves across the land, three process control the transfer of heat: o Conduction: transfer of heat by molecule to molecule contact o Radiation: transfer of heat in the form of invisible waves o Convection: transfer of heat by movement of a liquid or a gas • In wildfires, heat transfer is mainly by radiation and convection • Heat from radiation increases the surface temperature of the fuel • As air is heated, it becomes less dense and rises • The rising air removes heat from the zone of flaming and is replaced by fresh air • This fresh air (oxygen) sustains the combustion Extinction Phase ­ This is the point at which combustion ceases ­ There is no longer sufficient heat or fuel to sustain a fire Fuel • Types of fuel include leaves, woody debris, decaying organic material, grasses,  shrubs, etc. • If diseases or storms down large number of trees, the decaying material dries and  burns easily • The density of the forest plays a role: in western North America, dense boreal  forests contain abundant fuel supply Topography ­ The fuel content can vary by slope orientation ­ In the northern hemisphere, south­facing slopes are relatively warm and dry ­ Slopes exposed to prevailing winds are often drier ­ Wildfires burning on steep slopes preheat fuel upslope from the flames ­ This results in the spreading of a fire upslope Weather ­ Large wildfires are common following droughts ­ “Dry thunderstorms” with lightning can produce wildfires but the rain evaporates  before reaching the ground ­ Wind can help preheat unburned materials ­ Wind carries embers that can ignite spot fires ahead of the front (the boundary of  the main fire) Types of Fires • Wildfires are classified according to the layer of fuel that is allowing the fire to  spread: surface or crown • Surface fires travel close to the ground and burn shrubs, leaves, twigs, grass, etc. • They vary in intensity but most move relatively slowly • Both pictures are surface fires and the photo on the right shows a front   • • • • • Crown fires move rapidly through the forest canopy by flaming combustion • They can be fed by surface fires that move up limbs or tree trunk, or they may  spread independently of surface fires • They are driven by strong winds and are common in  boreal forests Crown Fires  ­ Intermittent crown fires consume the tops of some  trees in an area ­ Continuous crown fires consume the tops of all trees  Regions at Risk • In Canada, the hazard is greatest in British Columbia and in the boreal forests of  the Canadian Shield region • The geographic region most at risk changes annually with the weather and  corresponds to area experiencing drought • Region of risk changes every year, it depends on where the droug
More Less

Related notes for Geography 2152F/G

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit