Class Notes (836,562)
Canada (509,854)
Geography (1,355)
Lecture

GEO 2410B LEC 1-2.docx

15 Pages
89 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Geography
Course
Geography 2410A/B
Professor
Jeff Hopkins
Semester
Winter

Description
Space & Social Inequalities  2014­01­14 Read on chapter per week Go for the concepts not minor details  Pick a few dates for next tutorial for micro­lecture  Social Geography:  Studies the ways in which social relations, social identities, and social inequalities  Social relations: relations between people as individuals, groups and institutions.  Social identities: meaning people attribute to themselves and others: gender, race/ethnicity, class,  age, disability, sexuality, and others…  Social inequalities: unequal distribution of, and access to, power, opportunities and resources.  Productions of Relations, Identities, Inequalities:  The economic, political, and cultural processes that produce, reproduce, sustain and modify  social relations, identities and inequalities.  We humans create our solutions and our problems. i.e we have poverty in Canada because we accept it.  Spatial variation: the change in social relations, identities and inequalities between and over space. I.e  Income ratios globally, municipally…etc.  Why is that? Do homeless people choose to be homeless? Woman chooses to be raped? Role of Space in Construction: Location maters: spaces offer more, less or similar opportunities, resource and power. Also your place in  society, where you are born. Traditionally, you do as well as your parents do.  The greater the wealth the greater the life expectancy  Wealthier country and individual, longer the life spans. AIM OF SOCIAL GEO:  Expose the forms of power, which lead to social and spatial oppression and inequality.   Other forms of wealth. With great power comes great responsibility. What is power? The ability to influence, if not determine, how people act, directly or indirectly. Examples? Professors  indirectly influence students with grades.  Direct force, “give me your wallet” Domination an asymmetrical—uneven—relationship where one individual, group, organization or institution is endowed  with power in a way that excludes and thus..  Resistance: An action—implicit or explicit—that seeks to negate the power of another individual, group or  organization.  Could be the oppressed resisting domination OR the dominant resisting the liberation of the oppressed.  Examples?  Right to Life, can be as simple as product choices, refusing to buy certain product.  Emphasis Of Social Geography The welfare issues—matters of living and being well—that affect people’s everyday lives: family, basic  needs (food, shelter, employment).  Income, health, education, food, households, employment, shelter, opportunity, safety, health care, family,  equality Social Geography is issue driven.  2. Society and Space Society 1. Cluster of…individuals, insitiurions, relationships, forms of conduct, material and social  practices.  2. A series of ‘discourses’… representations, practices, and performances through which  meanings are produced. How are people represented?  Particular social formations or interest groups e.i Christian Society.  Human beings make choices and take actions in social contexts: no individual action is independent of  ‘society’ (social relations and social identities) and space.  Space reflects social activity i.e. areas reflect social relations, identities and inequalities.  Knowledge is power, space is power.  Space is NOT socially deterministic i.e. there is no spatial or social ‘determinism’ Point:  People can resist their social position, identities, and spaces, and choose to make different opportunities  and activities… BUT always within a social context of freedoms and constraints.  3 Inequalities and Social Justice  a) Difference “Unlike’ ‘distinct’ ‘dissimilar’  Spatial differentiation  b) Inequality  'Lack of equality'  ‘Lack of same kind of rank, value, size, number’ Inherent moral question of right or wrong  E.g woman ear less than men in Canada; 1 in 5 Canadian children live in poverty.  C) Social Justice  An ideal against which we measure the practices of society.  Whose IDEALS does one use to 'measure' society's practices? Parents, education, religion, heritage,  consumer ideology—commercial endeavours.  Youtube: The Emphatic Civilization  Class & Inequality In Canada  2014­01­14 1. Capitalism: Explained, Pros, Cons 2. Canada’s Economic Class Structure 3. Class Myths 4. Class as Personal Attributes  5. Class as Geographical  TUTORIAL WILL BE HELD IN ROOM 1059 SSC. 1. Capitalism: An economic system in which all or most of the means of production are  privately owned and operated for profit and the investment of capital is privately  determined: and in which production, distribution, and prices of goods, services and labour are  determined mainly through the influence of the forces of supply and demand in the operation of a free  market.  b. Capitalism explained Economic system Means of production all/mostly privately owned and operated for profit (land, labour, capital/materials)  Private investment and Private Profits  Supply and Demand of free market determine:  Production  Distribution  Prices  OF  Goods, services, and labour.  Prices are determined through the free market, highly skilled jobs pay more money.  Class & Inequality In Canada  2014­01­14 C. Mixed Economy (Canada) A capitalist economy in which government actively engages in managing, investing, profiting and restricting  the market place.  Political Left vs. Political Right A question of the role of governemtn in the economy  LEFT: NDP More gov’t regulation Same/higher taxes  Spend surplus on social programs  Less privatization  RIGHT: Conservatives  Less gov’t  Lower taxes  Return surplus  More privatization  D. Strengths/ Pros of Capitalism  Competition rewards innovation  Rewards individual initiative, risk­takers (investors)  Efficiency: cut cost—labour, land, production….  Class & Inequality In Canada  2014­01­14 Addresses consumer needs  Prices will be fair and competitive  Self­organizing  Competition rewards innovation  Trade promotes common interests  Creates material wealth E. Weakness/ Cons of Capitalism  Exploitation of resources (rain forest) Large disparity between poor and rich Capitalism is prominent on infinite growth and nothing lasts forever  Efficiency has a price: homogeneity—you get rid of diversity. No independent hardware stores.  Mindset: if it’s not profitable… it’s not worth it.  Profit over people and environment  ‘Natural’ Unemployment 3%­15% Exploits workers: don't share in big profits Creates material wealth for owners   F. Capitalism’s Foe: Karl Marx  German philosopher (1818­1883)
More Less

Related notes for Geography 2410A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit