History 2201E Lecture Notes - Lecture 18: Asbestos Strike, Padlock Law, Quebec Act

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Published on 19 Jul 2012
School
Western University
Department
History
Course
History 2201E
Page:
of 2
Lecture 18 Part 2 La Révolution Tranquille
The Quiet Revolution/La Révolution Tranquille
o Redefined French Canadian nationalism
Changed from inward looking to an outward looking modern
province
Afraid of losing their culture, even with the Quebec Act
French have good reason to be skeptical
System of defense to protect themselves from an English-
speaking world and everything that Quebec is not
o Education in Quebec still controlled by the Catholic church
No school boards, etc. like there was in all the other provinces
No sciences, technology, etc.
Many left Quebec for education, to English Canada or US
o Said that because of Duplessis, Canada stayed in the dark age
o Padlock Law
Introduced by Duplessis
To protect Quebec from communist propaganda
Government could evict any person and destroy goods without
due cause
Very harsh, repressive, in force for 20 years; overturned by the
Supreme Court in 1957
o Duplessis took hard and oppressive measures during Asbestos Strike
Catholic church splits as a result: some support Duplessis and
others supported the strikers
Bishop Charbonneau supported the strikers
o Neo-Nationalists
Wanted Quebec to be modern, but didn’t agree on how it
should happen
Differed politically
First wave of separatism, others didn’t agree
Wanted the government to take over the economy
o Jean Lesage
Takes over after Duplessis dies, Liberal
Supportive of the young intellectuals
Changes:
Changed electoral map to give better representation in
urban areas
Lower voting age from 21 to 18
Abolished law which kept legal status of women as
minors
Parent Report led to
o Ministry of Education and school boards
established in 1964
Changes to high level of education
o 2 year program created called Institutes;
prepared student for universities
o Exposed to science, technology, etc.
Emphasized flexibility through multiple options, key for
society to grow; cannot remain stagnant
Takes some control of economy by taking control of the
provincial industrial development
Made French Canadians owners as well as workers
E.g. Hydro Quebec
o Owned by the province, exports electricity to
other parts of Canada was well as US
o Rene Levesque
Founded the Bloc Quebecois party
In favour of Quebec separatism
o Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism
Boils down to an issue of language and culture
Problem seemed to be in Quebec itself, but had to be addressed
by the whole country
Quebec starting to push for its own rights of language and
culture
o Thought Quebec should be able to represent itself overseas in matters
of culture
Pearson accepted it under the agreement that it was kept to
matters of culture
Only province with a Department of Intergovernmental Affairs
Other provinces not sure what to make of this
o 1966: Lesage replaced by Daniel Johnson from the Union
Nationale
Creates the University of Quebec and Radio Quebec
Laid groundwork for Quebec’s health care system
Johnson continues tradition of resisting Ottawa in terms of
cross-chair programs
Never talked about Quebec separating

Document Summary

Lecture 18 part 2 la r volution tranquille. The quiet revolution/la r volution tranquille: redefined french canadian nationalism. Changed from inward looking to an outward looking modern province. Afraid of losing their culture, even with the quebec act. French have good reason to be skeptical. System of defense to protect themselves from an english- speaking world and everything that quebec is not: education in quebec still controlled by the catholic church. No school boards, etc. like there was in all the other provinces. Many left quebec for education, to english canada or us: said that because of duplessis, canada stayed in the dark age, padlock law. Government could evict any person and destroy goods without due cause. Very harsh, repressive, in force for 20 years; overturned by the. Supreme court in 1957: duplessis took hard and oppressive measures during asbestos strike. Catholic church splits as a result: some support duplessis and others supported the strikers.