Popular Uprising in the Later Middle Ages

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Published on 12 Mar 2012
School
Western University
Department
History
Course
History 2401E
Professor
Lecture 39 March 7, 2012
Popular Uprisings in the Later Middle Ages
Economic and Social Consequences of the Black Death
Number of fatalities destroyed agricultural business and severed trade productions
Loss of draft animals meant that starting agriculture business again would be difficult
1343-50: European commercial life halted
o After wave of death passed, spiral of inflation and recession occurred
o Survivors could not demand higher wages because there was a shortage of labour
Deduction in population meant drastic demand for things fell
Rent could be lower because landlords need people to rent land to
1/3 to ½ of population had died after plague
Blessing and a curse for those who survived the Black Death
Workers blamed for being responsible for bringing back economy
Government froze wages and prices
o Brought about revolts
Increase in class consciousness
o World had a structure where people have particular roles to play
o Increase in dissatisfaction in social responsibility and social place
Peasants hope for a better life were repressed
Ciompi Revolt (1378)
Unguilded textile workers
Most popular revolt
Attempted to lower wages and raise cloth price
Suddenly thousands were unemployed
Briefly captured control and demanded change
Revolt was short lived
Guild leaders quickly regained power
Jacquerie (1358)
Peasant uprising
Seen as an aimless and incoherent reaction to peasant’s unendurable conditions
Peasants in countryside around Paris suffered from social and economic consequences of
Black Death and Hundred Years’ War
During 100 Years’ War demanded taxes from people to help pay for the war
Local nobles were powerless do anything about this
o Added to peasants distress with new taxes
Peasants attacked and killed knights and squires
o Excited by their success and gathered followers
o Murdered the lord
Rebellion started to spread
Peasants declared that nobles were evil and deserved to die
Peasants never directed their frustration and anger towards the king
o Believed their local nobles were responsible for their oppression
Army of several thousands of rebels under William Karl’s leadership
o Marcell (merchant) agreed to create an alliance with Karl
o Marcell sent out supporters to help attack
Went to attack Meaux where wife and children of French king was staying
o In a fortified marketplace
o Townspeople of Meaux opened doors to rebels
o Peasants assaulted stronghold
Proved to be a turning point
o 2 noblemen from the south happy to participate
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Document Summary

Economic and social consequences of the black death. Number of fatalities destroyed agricultural business and severed trade productions. Loss of draft animals meant that starting agriculture business again would be difficult. 1343-50: european commercial life halted: after wave of death passed, spiral of inflation and recession occurred, survivors could not demand higher wages because there was a shortage of labour. Deduction in population meant drastic demand for things fell. Rent could be lower because landlords need people to rent land to. 1/3 to of population had died after plague. Blessing and a curse for those who survived the black death. Workers blamed for being responsible for bringing back economy. Government froze wages and prices: brought about revolts. Increase in class consciousness: world had a structure where people have particular roles to play. Increase in dissatisfaction in social responsibility and social place. Peasants hope for a better life were repressed. Attempted to lower wages and raise cloth price.

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