Class Notes (835,893)
Canada (509,478)
History (2,139)
Lecture

History of Disease Lec#11.docx - Antibiotic Revolution

10 Pages
51 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
History 2812E
Professor
Shelley Mc Kellar
Semester
Winter

Description
History of Disease Lec#11 03/19/2014 The End of Infectious Diseases? The Antibiotic Revolution I. The Golden Age of Medicine Vaccine is a success story and supports the rise of the golden age of medicine  • • In terms of the impact, it is really hard to exaggerate the tremendous impact vaccination has made  • No other thing other than safe water has contributed to such high progression in public health • Vaccines are meant to promise to confer immunity to these deadly and fatal infectious diseases  • Health policy innitatives around vaccination campaigns are geared towards the protection of  communities, not the individual  • “Herd Immunity” or herd protection • There is a public debate between societal public health and individual rights and making individual  decisions • Vaccines are shown and proven to be effective, safe, and cheap • This doesn’t mean that vaccination policies don’t need to be reviewed, modified, discussed  Now we have the ability to identify the causes of disease • • II. Microbe Hunters and “Magic Bullets” • Crucial to understanding the golden age of medicine is the rise of the germ theory which supports how  we understand and diagnose disease  • Understanding the disease will shape peoples treatment choices and options  • If the first step is to isolate the microbes, the second step is destroying that microbe • Even with initial success, it does not start the snowballing effect right away • A lot of historians say that 1909 is the year when microbe hunters had the ability to destroy microbes • It began in 1909 largely because of Paul Ehrlich when he designed the magic bullet that entered the  body, sought out the one single microbe of the disease, and destroyed only that microbe without  destroying anything else in the body • This happened with the syphilis microbe • Microbe hunters are key in our ability to control and vanquish infectious disease  • a. The Sulfa Drugs: Prontosil (1935)  The Sulfa drugs get passed over quickly  It is an important stage before penicillin   It happened in the 1930s and before the drugs there was a time that someone could  die from a sore throat   Death by any infection  They supported this idea of searching and destroying specific microbes   The rise of anti biotics  Gerhard Domagk noticed in 1932 that there was a red dye that could seek out  and destroy bacteria as seen in his lab mice  He starts to work with other dyes (ones that hadn’t been patented)   None of them work as well as the red dye known as Prontosil  It worked well on animals, but when is the right to transfer the animal model on the  human model  THEN his daughter falls ill with infection, and in desperation he gives her a dose of  Prontosil  She makes a complete recovery   In 1935 he decides to publish his findings   ONE downside, it turns the human skin red   What another scientist is able to do is divide the drug into two, find the anti agent that  turns the skin red and separate it from the active agent that destroys the microbe  This is an amazing break through  What the sulfa drugs do is t stops the infection from spreading any further  It stops the bacteria from multiplying and therefore stopping the infection and basically  starves the infection  The sulpha drug takes off based on this premise   They are now given for child bed fever, and pnemonia   Domagk is recognized and honored with the Nobel Prize but is forced to decline the  prize due to political reasons (WWII and Hitler) a. The Discovery of Penicillin (1928)  Early 1940’s discovery, but it dates back before the sulpha drugs in 1928  Alexander Fleming is crediting in 1928 with the  He discovers the agent that leads to penicillin but if it had stopped with just Fleming it  would not have been available to the public like it came to be  He is busy in his lab working with different colonies of bacteria in the petrie dishes   Fleming has his petrie dishes set up ad what happens is he goes on vacation  When he comes back he sees that one of his colonies of bacteria has been  contaminated because he finds mold   Before throwing it out he looks at the mold and the nature of how it has formed  Fleming takes notice of it and starts to look at it and study it   He calls the substance that is killing his bacteria, penicillin  HE writes on this in 1929 and says that the mold kills bacteria, but acknowledges that  he cannot keep the active agent alive long enough to deliver it into a form to inject into  humans  He hopes that someone might see the article and will take the idea and run with it to  help find a way to progress this discovery  No one takes notice of it until the 40s  When they do, it is Ernest Chain and Howard Florey   What they do is they isolate the active ingredient and develop a powder form of the  active agent  But they cannot find a way to sustain the effectiveness of the anti agent for longer than  a few days   They are having trouble sustaining the effectiveness  They need mass production help  Because Europe is the center of the war, they turn to the United States and reach out  to Puria Labs in Illinois in July 1941  Penicillin was made available to soldiers,   It was costly at first, 20 dollars at first  Then after the war it dropped to 50 cents a dose  This discovery had a huge effect on the war, it saved many of lives that otherwise  would have been lost to infection  Fleming and Florey get knighted in 1944  All three of the scientists win the noble prize as well  In 1948 the scientist at the Puria Lab gets the patent for mass producing penicillin and  is recognized for his contributions  Penicillin sharply reduces the bacterial infections of the time  The sulpha drugs were about prohibiting and stopping multiplication, where as  penicillin is about seek and destroy   Killing the bacteria   This opens the door for various other wonder drugs   b.  Streptomycin (1943) and other antibiotics Selman Waksman is a soil biologist (1943) Him and his colleagues identified another agent and its effectiveness in tuberculosis It is known as Streptomycin, and it becomes the first cure for Tuberculosis  This is another celebration of scientific research which provides therapy for human diseases Streptomycin it called a monotherapy – a one drug treatment The problem with monotherapy is that resistance starts to become a problem This observation that monotherpaies are prone to resistance raises the flag and raises a threat to the whole  paradigm of antibiotic therapy  Scientists regroup and say that to defend themselves to resistance is to come up with a combination drug  that will help to trick the microorganisms  He get the Nobel Prize in 1952 for his discoveries  The antibiotic treatment for tuberculosis is seen as one of the greatest triumphs of the twentieth century fo
More Less

Related notes for History 2812E

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit