Health Sciences 1001A/B Lecture Notes - Blood Alcohol Content, Standard Drink, Ethanol

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Published on 19 Apr 2013
School
Western University
Department
Health Sciences
Course
Health Sciences 1001A/B
Professor
Page:
of 5
Chapter 15: Alcohol
Stats:
- 79.3% of Canadians reported alcohol consumption in the past year
- 44% reported drinking weekly
- Males are more likely than females to report drinking in the past year
- ~ 95% of university students consume alcohol
- Through automobile crashes and other injuries, alcohol is the leading cause of death
among people ages 15 to 24
- Ethyl alcohol is the most common psychoactive ingredient in all alcoholic beverages
- When consumed, alcohol is absorbed into the bloodstream from the small intestine,
stomach and the colon
- It is then distributed throughout the body’s tissues, affecting nearly every body system
- Main site of alcohol metabolism = liver transforms alcohol into energy and other
products
- Body can metabolize roughly
¾ of a drink in 1 hour
although, varies widely
- If more alcohol is consumed
than is metabolized, blood
alcohol concentration (BAC)
will steadily increase, as will
intoxication
From Reading:
- In Canada, any beverage
containing 1.1% or more
alcohol is considered to be an
alcoholic beverage
- Alcohol contains seven
calories per gram, and per drink is usually 100-200 calories. Beer provides 150 calories
(light = 100 calories). Glass of wine = 100 calories.
- 20% of alcohol is rapidly absorbed through the stomach, and 75% through the upper part
of the small intestine (composition of the drink will affect the absorption rate)
- Main site for metabolism of alcohol is the liver. About 2-10% of alcohol is unchanged
and excreted via the lungs, kidneys and sweat glands
- 50-60% of a person’s risk for alcoholism is determined by genetic factors
Body Alcohol Concentration:
- Measure of intoxication determined by the amount of alcohol consumed in a given
amount of time.
BAC depends on:
- Sex
- Weight
- Body fat
- Water content in body’s tissues
- Concentration of alcohol in beverage
- Rate of consumption
- Volume of alcohol consumed
Levels of BAC and their effects:
- Using alcohol while taking a medication that can cause CNS depression increases the
effects of both drugs, potentially leading to a coma, respiratory depression, and death.
- Mixing 3 or more drinks per day with Aspirin, ibuprofen or aceraminophen increases risk
of stomach bleeding or liver damage.
Drinking and Driving:
- MADD (mothers against drunk driving)
- 16-25 year olds = 13.2% of Canada’s
population = 33.4% of Canada’s alcohol
related traffic deaths
- Highest rate of impaired driving deaths
occurs at 19
- Drinking = impaired judgement, reaction
time and coordination (all critical reasons
why individuals under the influence should
not drive)
- Since 1969 the legal BAC while driving is
0.08% (if you have your G license)
- Many provinces have implemented legal consequences for individuals caught driving
with the BAC between 0.05 and 0.08% (“warn-range”)
Video: Understanding Canada’s Low-Risk Drinking Guidelines
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbpdMFE-AIE
Standard Drink:
5.0 oz, 142mL wine = 12 oz, 341mL beer = 1.5 oz, 43mL hard liquor = standard
Low risk drinking guidelines:
** Maximum amounts
Healthy man = no more than 3 standard drinks a day and 15 in a week. Every week should have
at least 2 days without drinking to avoid habituation.
Healthy women = no more than 2 standard drink a day and no more than 10 standard drinks in a
week. Every week should have at least 2 days without drinking to avoid habituation
Zero % alcohol is the limit when:
- Driving
- Taking medication
- High risk activities
- Recommended by health professional
- When pregnant, making important decisions and when responsible for others

Document Summary

79. 3% of canadians reported alcohol consumption in the past year. Males are more likely than females to report drinking in the past year. ~ 95% of university students consume alcohol. Through automobile crashes and other injuries, alcohol is the leading cause of death among people ages 15 to 24. Ethyl alcohol is the most common psychoactive ingredient in all alcoholic beverages. When consumed, alcohol is absorbed into the bloodstream from the small intestine, stomach and the colon. It is then distributed throughout the body"s tissues, affecting nearly every body system. Main site of alcohol metabolism = liver transforms alcohol into energy and other products. Of a drink in 1 hour although, varies widely. If more alcohol is consumed than is metabolized, blood alcohol concentration (bac) will steadily increase, as will intoxication. In canada, any beverage containing 1. 1% or more alcohol is considered to be an alcoholic beverage. Alcohol contains seven calories per gram, and per drink is usually 100-200 calories.