Class Notes (834,991)
Canada (508,850)
Health Sciences (2,076)
Lecture

healthsi.doc

2 Pages
93 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Health Sciences
Course
Health Sciences 1001A/B
Professor
Jessica Polzer
Semester
Fall

Description
Whitehall Study (1967)  Study of 18,000 civil servants (male government workers) aged 35-55 - Administry type positions - Similar working environments  Main findings: - Focused on CVD - The more senior you are in the employment hierarchy the longer you will live, and the less likely you will die from CVD. - Class 5 is the lowest level (unskilled labour) - Class 1 is the highest level (manager) - Lowest class had a mortality rates that was 3 times higher then that of the highest employment grade. - Mortality rates increased gradually as you went down through the different grades. - Also found an increase in morbidity, mortality, and risk of high risk behaviours for the following: cancer, lung disease, depression, suicide, smoking, obesity, lower levels of physical activity in employees of the lower grades. - Even with high risk behaviours, the higher grades only had 2 times the risk of CVD. Myths: 1. People in high executive positions have more heart attacks because of their stress levels (not true) 2.Poor health is only for people in poverty, for people who are a disadvantage to society. (not true) Black Report (1980)  1977 – Sir Douglas Black commissioned by federal government (UK) to write report investigating why NHS had failed to reduce inequalities in heal
More Less

Related notes for Health Sciences 1001A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit