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HealthSci 1002 Lecture Note - Globalization, Trade and Health.docx

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Department
Health Sciences
Course Code
Health Sciences 1002A/B
Professor
Jessica Polzer

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Description
Globalization, Trade and Health - Child and adult mortality rates worldwide have been decreasing, but there is a significant difference in the rates between different countries - Life expectancy is lower for males than females in USA, but is much closer between males and females in other countries - “Developing Countries” are characterized by having: low levels of income, high population density, high fertility, wide gaps between the rich and poor, high morbidity and high mortality - It implies that countries should be more alike Western countries - Brain drain: health care workers and resources are being sucked out of those countries into to other countries - Globalization: economic (trade policies, creating a world market), political (spread of neoliberal political ideology – rule of the market) and cultural (language – spread of English language around the world) - Globalization processes are associated with neoliberal policies - Structural adjustment programs (SAPs) are conditional loans promoted by the IMF and WB - IMF and World Bank have played a big role in creating economic injustice - Major trade centers used to be located in Northern Euro
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