Class Notes (834,037)
Canada (508,290)
Health Sciences (2,076)
Lecture

Facial, Head, and Neck Muscles .docx

3 Pages
84 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Health Sciences
Course
Health Sciences 2300A/B
Professor
Jamie Melling
Semester
Fall

Description
The Muscular System ­ Muscles of the Head and Neck Muscles of Facial expression ­ common nerve supply via Cranial nerve 7 *(facial) ­ Occipitofrontalis ­ two bellies, one central tendon. Each belly performs a different  function. ­ Frontalis belly controls movement of eyebrows ­ fascia around eyes. ­ Occipitalis belly draws scalp backwards. ­ Orbicularis Oculis ­ surrounds eye, called the ‘winking’ muscle. ­ Zygomaticus (major and minor ­ grouped) ­ attach around mouth, ‘smiling’ muscle. ­ Obicularis Oris ­ ‘kissing’ muscle.  ­ Depressor Anguli Oris ­ attaches from corner of chin (mandibular angle) to corner of  mouth. Called the ‘frowning’ muscle.  ­ Platysma ­originates on the pectoralis major, reaches to mandible. Called the ‘shaving’  muscle ­ men when they shave contract this muscle to tighten skin around neck.  ­ Buccinator ­ serves other functions, not just subject to facial expression. Called the  ‘whistling’ muscle, there are two of them, and they are not contracted simultaneously;  one contracts first.  Facial Nerve (VII) Arises in brainstem ­ Enters through internal acoustic meatus ­ Exits via the styloid­mastoid foramen  5 main branches ­ Temporal ­ Zygomatic ­ Buccal  ­ Mandibular ­ Cervical Bell’s Palsy refers to damage of the facial nerve, resulting in a droopy appearance. Some  of the muscles of facial expression lose functioning.  Muscles of Mastication ­ Masseter ­ named for its size. Attaches from zygomatic down to angle of  mandible. Contraction of this muscle closes the jaw.  ­ Temporalis ­ originates off of temporal bone. Moves underneath zygomatic  process. Inserts onto coronoid processes on mandible.  The above muscles are innervated by the mandibular branch of the Trigeminal nerve.  There are three branches of cranial nerve 5, the first branch is the Opthlamic nerve,  second is the maxillary nerve (goes through rotundrum), and third is the Mandibular  nerve (innervating the masseter and the temporalis muscles) ­ Buccinator ­ largely responsible for moving cheeks inward, as well as side­to­ side. Allows you to put food between your molars for proper chewing. Innervated  by the facial nerve.  Deeper Layers  ­ Two pterygoid muscles arise from the pterygoid plate of the sphenoid bone.  o Lateral pterygoid muscle runs from the lateral pterygoid process to the  temporal mandibular joint. When it contracts it pulls the jaw forward  (protraction).  o Medial pterygoid stems off of process of sphenoid bone but moves  downwards to angle of mandible (on inside of bone). Moves jaw side  to side. Assists the buccinator in keeping food in molars. Delicate  movements ­ not abrupt.  Muscles of the Tongue (Glossus) Intrinsic muscles of tongue important to speech & chewing ­ not prime moves of jaw. ­ Styloglossus ­ Stoyloid process down to glossus (underneath tongue). During  contraction, it moves tongue towards styloid processes ­ retraction & slight  elevation.  ­ Hyloglossus ­ Runs from hyoid bone to bottom of tongue. Draws sides of  tongue downwards.  ­ Genioglossus ­ Innerside of mandible to underside of tongue. Contracts and  brings tongue forwards.  Those three muscles are innervated by the Hypoglossal cranial nerve (7).  ­ Palatoglossus ­ important role in gag reflex. Soft palate to underside of  tongue. Pushes tongue against soft palate (roof of mouth).  The palatoglossus muscle is the only glossus muscle innervated by the vagus nerve.  Extrinsic Muscles of the Eye Trochlear Nerve innervation 
More Less

Related notes for Health Sciences 2300A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit