Class Notes (836,153)
Canada (509,662)
Kinesiology (3,221)
Lecture

Kin 1080b - Part 1.docx
Premium

8 Pages
61 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Kinesiology
Course
Kinesiology 1080A/B
Professor
Matthew Heath
Semester
Winter

Description
What is Psycho­Motor Learning? Plasticity – the ability to learn and acquire new skills • Result of how the nervous system makes new neural connections  Optogenetics • Using light to control nerve activity in the brain • Alters behaviour Extrafusal muscle fibres – power producing muscle fibres, cause movement  • Run in parallel with each other  Intrafusal muscle fibres – designed to detect stretch in a muscle, stretch information  detected is important because it tells your CNS where your limbs are in relation to the  rest of your body, proprioceptive fence MOTOR LEARNING AND CONTROL DEFINED  Motor Learning • A set of internal processes associated with practice or experience leading to a  relatively permanent gain in performance capability  Performance effect – learning something one day, and the day after you forget the  skill Learning effect – relatively permanent, much more effective Motor Control • An area of study dealing with the understanding of the neural, physical and  behavioural, cognitive aspects of movement HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF MOTOR LEARNING/CONTROL  *See diagram – slide 4* • Motor learning and control developed from psychology, neuroscience,  engineering and education Psychology  • Most important contribution • Started in late 1950’s with Richard Schiffrin  o Came up with short term memory system and how it contributes to our  learning of new information  1. The brain as a computer: the serial nature of information processing 2. Memory for different tasks: motor tasks vs. cognitive tasks • First information you get must be processed before you can process more  information Semantic information – factual information (E.g. Math equations)  Cognitive information – new movements  *CNS structures that allow us to acquire new movement are different from structures that  allow us to perform movements  Engineering  Human engineering 1. Arthur Melton • Pilots can be selected based on specific individuals abilities • Laid ground work for future tests, however, his theory didn’t work 2. Paul Fitts • Too many air plane accidents the result of faulty human/machine interface • Forefather of the field of ergonomics • How we process information influences our interactions with machines and  computers Incompatible Spatial Mapping  Neuroscience  Reciprocal innervation/inhibition  • First understood by C.S. Sherrington • • Suppresses activity of an antagonist muscle when agonist active o Agonist is on, antagonist is off o If this doesn’t happen you have co­contraction  • Explains phenomenon such as walking and reaching • Final common path at the spinal cord produce muscular contraction  fMRI • Get an individual to perform a task and see what areas of the brain become  activated Education  Franklin M. Henry • Examined while body movements and developed experimental approaches to  understanding how we “learn” to produce complex movements  • Focused on how people learn whole body techniques THE NERVOUS SYSTEM Divisions of the Nervous System CNS • Division of the nervous system  • Comprised of the brain and spinal cord Peripheral Nervous System • Somatic division of the PNS o Intrafusal muscle fibres send messages to the somatic division  o Information is relayed through this division  • Autonomic division of the PNS HIERARCHICAL ORGANIZATION OF THE CNS The hierarchy: • Think of the cerebral cortex as the “big boss”, it tells everyone else what to do  and when to do it – classic view but not necessarily a contemporary view  • Think of the thalamus, basal ganglia, pons and cerebellum as being second in  command • The brainstem is third in command – a relay station  • The spinal cord is a “slave” system to all the above – common pathway to action • Subcortical structures are responsible for modifying signals originally from the  cerebral cortex  People with locked in syndrome have damage to their brain stem LUIGI GALVANI (1737 – 1798) “Animal electricity” • Frogs hind limbs twitched as a result of exposure to electricity  • He hooked up frogs to a lightening pole during a thunder storm • Learned that muscles move through bioelectrical signals  NEURON – BUILDING BLOCK OF THE CNS • Young children are able to generate new neurons • Older people are able to generate new neural pathways o You develop more dendritic branches and axonal branches o How you are able to develop new motor skills o Repeated exposure results in stronger neural pathways  • Myelin sheath allows for very effective axonal conduction  • Different neurons have different thickness of the myelin sheath allowing for  different speeds of neural conduction • Neural impulses move at 900m/s – extremely quickly NEURONS AND THE NEUROMUSCLAR SYSTEM Motor unit – comprised of a single alpha motor neuron and all the muscle fibers that it  innervates  • Alpha motor neuron innervates extrafusal muscle fibers  o Extrafusal is the power producing unit  • Can have direct communication with an alpha motor neuron and a neuron in the  CNS SPEED OF NERVE CONDUCTION RT History • Helmholtz (1850’s) o Interested in speed of nerve conduction o Used isolated muscle and motor nerve of a frog o Measured time between electrical stimulation and muscle contraction  • Would gain direct access to neuron  • Activated the cell body and waited to see how long it took for the muscle to  contract  • He would then change the location of the stimulus and used the 2 numbers to  determine the speed of the signal  Helmholtz (1850’s) • Estimate speed of human nerve conduction • Measured reaction time in response to electrical stimulus to 2 points (E.g. foot,  thigh) • Nerve conduction velocity very fast (35­60 m/s) • That speed is about 1/10 the speed of sound (speed of sound = 1238 km/h) Disease of the Nerve 1. Disease of the nerve influences amplitude of nerve conduction • E.g. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) or more commonly referred to as  Lou Gehrig’s disease • What happens when the amplitude of nerve impulse is diminished? 2. Disease of the myelin influences conduction speed • E.g. Multiple sclerosis (MS) • Destroys the myelin in patches along the CNS MS • Demyelinated is systematic and can be found high up in the CNS MANY DIFFERENT TYPES OF NEURONS 1. Motor (efferent) neurons • Transmit motor commands down the spinal cord 2. Sensory (affere
More Less

Related notes for Kinesiology 1080A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit