Class Notes (836,670)
Canada (509,870)
Law (818)
Law 2101 (735)
Lecture

international law1

5 Pages
109 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Law
Course
Law 2101
Professor
Mysty Sybil Clapton
Semester
Winter

Description
The Dualist Approach to Integrating International Law into Domestic Law November 21, 2013 What do I mean by International law? (1) Treaties: "Treaty means an international agreement concluded between States in written  form and governed by international law, whether embodied in a single instrument,  or in two or more related instruments and whatever its particular designation." • Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, article 2: (1) International agreement in writing; (2) Between states [or between a state and an international organization such as  the UN]; (3) Formed with an intent to be bound; and (4) Governed by international law. ­ As long as it meets these points, it can be considered a treaty ­ Treaties set out laws bound by all those who agree (2) Customary International Law Bilateral, Multilateral and Plurilateral Treaties • Bilateral treaties: those between Canada and one other country. (such as a free  trade agreement between Canada and Columbia) • Multilateral treaties: those between three or more countries generally developed  under the auspices of international organizations. (more often what Canada joins,  negotiated through international organizations such as the UN­ human rights,  most important is the United Nations Charter) • Plurilateral treaties: generally entered into between one State and a group of  States. (Not necessarily international organizations involved) ­ Treaties are best known source of international law­ NAFTA (North American Free  Trade agreement), The Rome Statute, The Boundary Water treaties­ draws the border  between Canada and the U.S.A. The Kyoto Protocol  Signature and Ratification Once a treaty has been negotiated and legalized, there are often two steps that take place  before a country becomes bound by a treaty: 1. Signature – to express political support; and 2. Ratification – to express agreement to be legally bound by the terms of the treaty.  Monism and Dualism: Theories about how international law gets incorporated into  domestic law. Monism:  international law is immediately incorporated as part of a state’s  domestic law – for example, in the case of a treaty, upon a state ratifying that treaty, if it  is a modest country. No dichotomy • If conflict between domestic and international law, international law wins.  Domestic law that doesn’t fit will be rid of • Most monist countries are civil law countries Arguments by Monists: • International and domestic law are part of a continuous legal system, they are all  integrated into each other • Law is an organic whole:  international law sets the boundaries of what states can  and cannot do, and then states operationalize that in domestic law. • If a country ratifies a law, it may as well be incorporated into domestic law, it is  more consistent and uniform Dualism:  there is a strict separation between the international and the domestic  spheres of law. International law does not enter domestic law until it is changed into  domestic law.  The states believe that international law is completely different than  domestic law. Most common law countries take this approach Arguments by Dualists: • Domestic law regulates relations between individuals within a state, and  international law governs states. • International and domestic law regulate discrete subject matter: domestic law  covers issues relating to individuals within a state, whereas international law  covers issues relating to state­to­state interaction.  • State­ law­ individuals (domestic). Under international, all states are equal, and  they exist side by side • Retains sovereignty of state Entry of International Law into Domestic Law • Monism: Automatic incorporation: International legal rules are automatically  incorporated into domestic law. • Dualism: International law must be transformed into domestic law through a law­ making process [usually legislation].   • International law has no direct effect on a domestic legal system.  The domestic  legal system creates a new rule of its own which mirrors the international rule. What is Canada’s practice? Canada: Dualism Approach for Treaties • When Canada ratifies a treaty, Canadian law does not automatically change. • Canada must transform the treaty into domestic law ­ done through domestic  legislation. Canada’s Policy on Tabling of Treaties in Parliament • Once a treaty has been (ratified) signed by Canada, the Minister of Foreign  Affairs creates a memo explaining the treaty and what it means for Canada. • Minister provides the memo and a copy of the treaty to the House of Commons. • Then there is a waiting period of at least 21 sitting days during which Members of  Parliament can debate the treaty and whether Canada should ratify. • After the 21 sitting days, the government can introduce legislation to  t
More Less

Related notes for Law 2101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit