MIT 2000 Photography -jan 28th

3 Pages
127 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Media, Information and Technoculture
Course
Media, Information and Technoculture 2000F/G
Professor
Daniel Robinson
Semester
Winter

Description
MIT 2000 Lecutre 4­ Photography Early Photography ­Louis Daguerreotype 1839.  Created a unique image, could not duplicate it. ­Changes in 1850s with rise of new form: Wet Plate Collodion Process.  Can make  multiple prints from single glass negative.  ­Changed again in 1870s to rise of: Dry Plate Process by George Dawson.  Not more  portable darkrooms.  But you did not need the same chemicals Photographic Portraiture  ­Mathew Brady worked from 1840s­1870s.  He has very weak eye site so his assistants  had to run many of his operations ­They did a lot of portraiture of celebrities and generals ­Nationalism ­Citizenship ­Character ­They found it was seem as an embodiment of national history and citizenship to take  these portraits.  Were done with the strong emphasis of the people, backgrounds were  simple, lighting would emphasis the good qualities of the peoples faces.   Democratic Portraiture ­Prior to this you had to hire an artist and pay a lot of money to have a painting portrait of  yourself.  So this gave middle class and working classes the ability to afford having a  portrait of them.  Would cost about 50cents at the time, (equivalent of half a days labor)  ­Individual as coherent self ­A way of capturing a symbol of ones inner self, and character.  This was seen as what  was captured in a portrait at the time.   ­It was also a way of a keepsake of the deceased because people died so much more often The Living Dead ­Photo keepsake of the deceased ­Because many children would die before they could have a photograph taken of them,  they would take a picture of them right after they died.   ­Example of the picture of a baby that died.  Made it look like the baby was sleeping,  would portray a peaceful state ­You would never do this now at a funeral home, where someone would take a picture of  the deceased to keep.   Seeing, Believing: War Documentary ­At this time it was a major part to photograph parts of the civil war, to keep as historical  proof ­Burden of Truth ­Civil war 1861­65 – Mathew Brady, A. Gardner/T.O’Sullivan ­Orchestrated realism  Ken Burns Documentary “The Civil War” (made 15 years ago) Social Documentary ­Jacob Riis –“How the Other Half Lives”, 1890 –documented photographically, the  slums in New York, homeless people, windowless rooms, garbage­strewn backyards,  sweat shops labour.  Wanted to show this to the privileged side of New York to show  them what the other side of New York was living in.  It was a way of social reform.   ­Affected social change ­Reform movement ­Cultural ‘Other’­ the photographs were often designed to put them in a different box  than other people and to show the differences between high society and the poor.   The Rise of the Kodak Camera, 1888 ­Created by George Eastman ­Hand­held, point and shoot box camera ­Would s
More Less

Related notes for Media, Information and Technoculture 2000F/G

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit