MIT 2200-Culturalism- Jan 15th -Lecture 1

7 Pages
117 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Media, Information and Technoculture
Course
Media, Information and Technoculture 2200F/G
Professor
Alison Hearn
Semester
Winter

Description
MIT 2200­Lecture 1­ Culturalism­ Jan 15 th The Earliest Universities –Haskins ­One example of how the human drive to communicate, ‘make common,’ to learn  becomes institutionalized  ­12  Century Renaissnce ­Southern Universities in Italy ­A move beyond already entrenched forms of knowledge (via the Church: grammar,  rhetoric, logic, arithmetic, geometry)  ­Informed by movement of peoples, the growth of the learned professions ­Grew in centers of material trade.   A Universitas of Students  ­Universitas denotes only the totality of a group –Haskins 23 ­In ITALY: focused on medicine in Salerno and law in Bologna Growth of a student class:  ­Sons of nobility or growing merchant class ­Students leveraged their collective power over a town­ town versus gown conflicts and  formed ‘guilds’  Professors at the Mercy of Students ­had to secure a regular audience of five in their lectures ­They were not allowed to not show up to lecture or leave town ­Not allowed to skip or change material ­Worked on a fee per lecture basis ­Everything relied on the students and if they showed up ­Professors also formed guilds—requiring admission  ­‘License to teach’—the earliest degrees.  At the end of the course the students would get  a degree called “a License to teach” Northern Europe: ­Universities formed out of Cathedral schools: original power of curriculum held by the  Rector and chancellor ­Eventually students turned away from Church teachings, gathered in Paris to hear the  teachings of Peter Abelard: “the brilliant young radical with his persistent questioning and his scant respect for titled  authority, drew students in large numbers wherever he taught” ­The students took the Universities out and onto the street.  They were looking for  freedom of their teachings.  Because of this they were given a status as a student legally  to have better rights than non­students ­It was a student privilege and exemption fromregular rule of law  University developed as a Corporation of masters 1231: Universities are made of People ­Earliest remains of university architecture not before 14  century ­Universities not about buildings or administrators—but are made of men, an association  of students and teachers bound together in a common life of learning (34)  ­A site of culture/cultural production/communication shaped by both material exigencies  and spiritual imaginative yearning ­Was governed by the people.  It was not about the buildings, people would go to pubs to  learn as ‘students’.  It was just about people looking to learn.  ­Being physically present in a room or place or on the street, and talking about ideas, in  common. Mass Society Critics  ­Responded to the impact of the huge changes of the industrial revolution and the  massification of culture: the rise of the extension of the vote, urbanization, mass education, rise of new  media technologies (camera, photography, the printing press, radio, film), rise of  the working class and middle class, dwindling of the aristocracy, loss of  traditional centers of authority—church and family  ­living at a moment of mass social change ­All of sudden, people that never had access to these things that we live around, all of a  sudden had these things.  It was all new Through this social change TWO DEFINITIONS OF CULTURE emerged: 1) Culture as mass produced and imposed by industry—to produce mass films and  newspapers, so that large swaves of people were all informed and brought  together through this industrialization 2) Culture of the working class emerged in response to these changes and to the  growing power of the upper classes.  Saw the labour market shift and change,  many people left their farms and went to work in factories.  It was a start of  unionization.  To create culture from the industrialization but to express political  approaches to the place they live.  Started to vote, get involved and had a say.   They started to agitate  Matthew Arnold and Lucas critics: ­feared the mass as destructive, bestial, violent ­the growth of the working class and the rights of more lower class people threatened the  people who already had power.  ­believed some people were naturally better than others and that it should remain that  way.  Believed that some people were smarter than others, and that they should deserve  the money they get (The idea of the modern day rich 1%) ­Worried that mass culture and giving too many people too much power would dumb  down society, bring moral disorder and anarchy Matthew Arnold: ­Culture is ‘the best that has been thought and said in the world” ­Culture is the ability to recognize the best when you see it ­Culture is the application of moral, spiritual perfection (inner quality that we look and  desire to be like) (to get cultured) ­Culture is the drive toward, seeking of perfection “Sweetness and light” ­“The highly instructed few and not the scantily instructed many, will ever be organ to the  human race of knowledge and truth.  Knowledge and truth in the full sense of the words,  are not attainable by the great mass of the human race at all”  ­Pretty well said that not all could bring knowledge to the human race, only a select few  could bring about the culture of the world. ­Matthew Arnolds Oxford.  A place where the upper middle and upper class could go to  assume their natural position going toward.  Where the upper elites could got o network,  make friends, and further their power.  It was a place of privilege.   ­being culture is a minority from his perspective. Arnold “A Revolution from Above” ­Working class had lost the strong feudal habits of subordination and deference— emboldened by the franchise 1867 ­High culture was to be a weapon, along with police and the state for keeping the unruly  majority in their place  ­Education in the ways of high culture.  Education was the way to culture in Arnolds  opinion ­Was not looking to uphold the industrialization, but that you could not let power get into  the hands of the middle working class. That is was meant for the upper class and true  cultured  F.R. And Queenie Leavis ­F.R and his wife continued Arnold’s concern about the massification of culture and the  rise of anarchy.  ­The forces of the market and the politicization of the working class caused the  degradation of cultural and social values ­That it was degrading the culture of society and losing what was truly good as aposed to  a ‘cheap knock off’ ­At the time F.R only wrote his name on their works, even though his wife was also  involved. Only later were people told that she also wrote. Folk Culture Eroded by Mass Culture ­What we have lost is the organic community with the living culture it embodied.  Folk  songs, folk dances and Cotswold cottages and handicraft products are signs and  expressions of something more.  ­Believed that these old traditions have been ruined due to mass culture ­For F.R and Queenie they believed that mass culture is addictive, like a drug we drool in  front of it.   ­Mass culture panders to the lowest common denominator.   ­Called it indulgent ‘masturbatory’ and provides a pale substitute for real life. ­Education in real culture must be provided to help children resist its charms and create a  public educated n high culture and tradition.  ­They thought we need to bring education about mass culture, especially advertising  which they saw as cheats and lies.  Should teach kids that this mass culture is not quality  and high culture.   ­tried to teach people the degraded things of the time versus the true cultured works.  Leavisism: ­The Leavis’ view were enormously influentioal in the development of media studies  until the 60s ­Culture is tied to politics and makes a difference in the way society develops ­Popular culture and media need to be taught in schools  ­Believed that the media governs how our world is run and how it changes perspectives,  and that it needs to be critically looked at and educated through schooling.  ­That media makes a difference to politics After World War 2 we see a rise of issues to these Culturalism: Hoggart and Williams ­Were writing in response to the changes wrought by World War 2 in Britiain.  Were  writing just after England had been destroyed by the War and when the industry had to  reinvent itself.  There was a new surge of challenges in democratization.  ­They both came from working class backgrounds and political commitments informed  their work on cult
More Less

Related notes for Media, Information and Technoculture 2200F/G

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit