MIT 2200 Innis and the Medium Theory- Lecture 4

4 Pages
146 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Media, Information and Technoculture
Course
Media, Information and Technoculture 2200F/G
Professor
Alison Hearn
Semester
Winter

Description
MIT 2200­ Lecture 4 – Innis and the Medium Theory Harold Adams Innis­ Medium Theory­ A plea for time ­Could be aligned with critical theorists (Frankfurt school) similar ideas ­writing in the 40s­50s, eclipse of reason, impact of short term thinking, felt that society was “out  of balance” ­economist and a historian, who set out late in his career to write a history of the world through  the lens of the materiality of communications media ­a grand synthesis that combined a theory of state, a theory of culture, and a theory of technology ­motivated by a desire to intervene in a world he saw as highly unstable, centralized, present  minded with no sense of history or expansive sense of time, traditions, rituals or broader cultural  values  Background ­Born in rural southern Ontario near Hamilton  ­won scholarship to uni ­volunteered for the army in 1916, worked on communications ­returned to writer masters thesis on plight of returning soldiers; he became a life long pacifist ­hones his focus on power, empire and communications ­PhD at U of Chicago ­ history of CP Rail ­Taught political economy at UofT ­wrote on the history of the fur trade and relations with first nations; what we come to understand  as ‘Caanda’ ­ its roads, railways, water routes ­ were  dictated by the resource demands of an  empire ‘elsewhere’. The Staples Thesis ­Canada’s economy is governed by the production of one specific resource (fur,, cod, pulp and  paper, and oil) exploited and extracted by the technologies and interests foreign to those who live  here. It is now oil.  ­as a result, Canada will always be unstable and dependent nation on the periphery of the main  powers and dedicated to the maintenance and continued exploitability of her natural resources ­but Canada as ‘in between’ is also an opportunity which allows us to develop potent conceptual  and technological hybrids, esp in terms of communications media.  History of Communications Media ­from 1940 til 1952 he focuses on the history of communications media: 1000 page, densely  written manuscript turns into 3 books ­the formal structures and material realities of different media of communication, in interaction  with their social, political, economic context, work to shape or influence how we think, how we  learn, waht we think of as knowledge, how power operates, how we come to organize ourselves  socially, how we come to think about ourselves as certain types of individuals  Materiality of communications media ­does not just refer to the physical characteristics of the mediuhmmand the language and symbols  processed by the medium, but also to the cognitive, institutional and perceptual consequences and  forms of institutional organization attached to different methods and tools of communicating ­how do specific media of communication operate? what ideas and beliefs do they express and  encourage? which do they make more diffciult? what forms of power do they encourage or  facilitate? ­what worlds have we made as a result of our media communications? Materiality of Communications Media ­He wrote about Economics for most of his life ­Gives us an understanding between the relationship of technology and power and  knowledge ­He was one of the most famous Canadian academics at his time (from Ontario) ­Wrote about communications media later in his career, which at the time was strange and  new to him.  At the time he was ignored, it was only after his death that we have  celebrated his thoughts towards media ­Talks about the whole history of humans from the perspective of communication media ­He is interested in determination and how media goes to work in particular social  relations ­Is interested in political structures, scripts, practices, ways of doing, the landscape (water  ways and communication systems that emerged for us naturally in our environment) ­It was a type of technological determinism.  Went from McLuhan and Virilio to Innis:  asks what media does to us.  ­Innis is interested in determination, and how media determines these various things in a  society like language and culture ­His starting is communication media but is more interested in the rich interplay of all of  these methods ­Thinks of all of these methods and vectors colliding with one another, richly engaging  with all the other layers of culture and history, which all determine media as well. ­He was a PARTICULARIST, hated Marxism not because he was against the working  class, but because he thought it was something being taken out of a particular context and  put in another context.  His method was to start from the ground up The Bias of Communication ­each medium­ stone, clay, papyrus, parchement, paper, print, tends to engender a bias in  terms of forms of social and political organization and the control of information ­The bias of dominant form of communication medium in any society can help to explain  the character of that civilization – its development and its eventual collapse ­Bias for time/duration vs bias for space  ­Looked at how and what causes empires to form and rise, and how and why these  empires might fail. Bias for Time –example: pyramids or clay tablets ­Durable media, such as clay or stone ­Don’t encourage territorial 
More Less

Related notes for Media, Information and Technoculture 2200F/G

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit