Class Notes (1,100,000)
CA (630,000)
Western (60,000)
MOS (2,000)
Lecture

Management and Organizational Studies 2181A/B Lecture Notes - Social Anxiety Disorder, Microsoft Data Access Components, Rhett Butler


Department
Management and Organizational Studies
Course Code
MOS 2181A/B
Professor
Victoria Digby

Page:
of 4
Jeff Preston,
PhD Candidate – Media Studies
Founder, Mobilize March
Cripz.ca
UWO
Canadians (Adults) With Disabilities
2x less likely to obtain university credentials.
2001 25% working-aged Canadian’s without disability had completed a university.
14% with disability had achieved the same.
2006 15-24 year olds:
o51% with disabilities have not completed high school.
o42% without disabilities have not completed high school.
Disability Stereotypes
More likely to be unemployed.
More likely to be at the bottom of the income scale.
25-54 year olds:
oWith disability: 47% have personal income below $15,000.
oWithout a disability: 25%.
Jeff’s Background
Congenital Muscular Dystrophy.
Spokesperson for MDAC at 8 years old, poster child for 2 years.
YTV telethon.
Later nominated to the Easter Seals Ontario board of directors, eventually named
Vice Chair, sat on board for a total of six years.
First public presentation at 3 years old.
His parents never let him make excuses, taught him he needed to advocate himself.
Current
Beggar vs. barter, which story is true? Barter story is true origin of word
“handicapped.”
Myths of disability in the press:
oThe idiot/child
Disability as innocence/ignorance
Frail, weak, naïve
oThe Supercrip
Extraordinary individuals with extraordinary abilities
Emphasis on “overcoming” disability
oThe victim/villain
oObject of pity
oTwisted by limitation
Webcomic
Cripz
Comics with disabled characters, but not necessary about disabilities.
Telling their story, their way
oCharacters: Rhett (only wears medical scrubs) , Griff/Griffin, Kate.
A story with teeth
oLanguage
oFashion
oMedical model of disability
An opportunity for activism
oStairbombing
oChairbombing
oMinority of many
People saying they can’t afford to become wheelchair-friendly.
Types of Disability
Physical
Sensory (blind or deaf)
Intellectual
Social
oEx: social anxiety disorder
oUpcoming, will be very big soon.
What is a barrier?
Physical
oSandy beach
Architectural
oStairs
oSpace behind desks
Informational/Communicational
oSign language
oBliss boards
Technological
oWindows Vista cost $500 more if you’re deaf or blind
oiPhone is first consumer phone that reads things out and has voice control
Policy/Practice
oTaxis
oRule that there can only be 15 accessible cabs in London, only two or three on
the road at once
Attitudinal
oPerceptions and weird ideas about disabilities
What is the impact?
4.4 million Canadians self-identify having an activity limitation.
Education rights much lower within disabled population.
oApprox. 36% drop out of high school (compared to 18%).
oApprox. 36% graduate from college/university (compared to 51%).
Unemployment rate of 14.4% (equal rate to that of depression!), up from 10% before
recession.
oApprox. 35% of men with disabilities are employed full-time, compared to
53% of those without disabilities.
oApprox. 23% of women with disabilities are employed full-time, compared
37.4% of those without disabilities.
Those without jobs in Ontario are reliant on the Ontario Disability Support Program.
oYearly stipend $18,000 (you’re living in poverty).
oIf you make too much or get a full-time job, you’re removed.
oThey are always trying to kick you off.
Moving Forward
In 2005, the Ontario Gov. passed the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act
oA dramatic improvement on the ODA
The ODA was about planning, the AODA is about action!
oAims to make Ontario fully accessible by 2025 through five standards that
incrementally increase accessibility:
Customer Service
Transportation
Information and communication
Employment
Build environment
oO-Week doesn’t follow these rules.
oAODA DOES NOT REQUIRE RETROFIT!!!
What can you do?
In your personal life…
oTry not to make assumptions
Expect a wide variety of opinions
Be respectful and always ask how/if you can help
oEnsure your conversation style is age appropriate
Treat adults like adults
oTalk to the person, not the worker/interpreter
Treat them the same as everyone esle
If speaking to someone in a wheelchair, find somewhere to sit down
*ON TEST: Don’t be a dick.
oLimit your use of accessibility features
Power doors
Accessible bathrooms
Handicapped parking