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Lecture

MU1711 Mar 8

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School
Western University
Department
Music
Course
Music 1711F/G
Professor
Kate Helsen
Semester
Winter

Description
th Mar 8 – Music in the 16 Century: Sacred Vocal Music Divide/Conflict: Protestant and Roman Catholic Music Why? Sacred vocal music sung in the church. Martin Luther – Leader of the first Protestant movement – Musician – lute, flute, sang, composed. No problem with music (or polyphony) in the church – When met with troubles, he wanted to bring them to the authorities. Eventually, he made them public because he wanted change. – Wanted to encourage congregational involvement through music. He wanted to bring the people back to the fundamentals of music. Patterned a lot of his music and liturgy off the Catholic church. Not completely new – based off many years of tradition. – Creates chorales as a result of this desire. Chorales – Definition: hymns, sung in vernacular by the congregation, mostly formed from preexisting melodies – Congregation expected to sing with the soloists – audience participation so embedded in the chorales. – eg. 6-1 pg 166 – Chorales: one main melody but can be harmonized, like hymns in church today. Luther on Muisc – No issue with chorales being harmonized/elaborated on musically – Box pg 168: Luther on music. “Music is a gift of God, not a gift of men” – “Next to the Word of God” music “deserves the highest praise” Addressing the Ideas that Protestant Music is necessarily reserved and restrictive – In Dulci Jublio – First found on a manuscript from 1400 – 1533: published as a German Protestant chorale melody. 1545: another verse added (possibly by Luther) Calvin and Zwingli – John Calvin and U Zwingli also led Protestant movements – Less happy about music in the church – Calvin only allowed music as accompanied psalm singing. Zwingli didn't allow music in church at all. In England, Henry VIII – Church of England: result of power-struggle of Henry VII and the Pope – Current European Protestant movements provide a model for H
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