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Lecture

Music Lecture #8 Indonesian Music


Department
Music
Course Code
Music 1170A/B
Professor
Peter G Schultz

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Indonesia I
Indonesia
-“many yet one”
-little over 60 years old, 1700 islands filled with people of different ethnic
backgrounds
-very multicultural, 200 languages spoken, decided to create a state language
(Indonesian) that kids learn in school – language of business
-diversity vs. similarities
-gamelan – not just part of Indonesia, you can find them throughout southeast asia
-puppetry is and art shared throughout Indonesia
ogamelan ensemble may be used during puppetry
-today: focus on central javas
Central Java
-multiple ethnic group, but the majority is the Javanese (profess to be Muslim) but
they practice islam is different in Indonesia than in other parts
-animism belief that non-human things have spirits or souls
-gamelan performance can be outside a mosque performing for 2 weeks to honor
the birth of Muhammad this is how java muslims would view religion differently
than other places
Javanese Gamelan
-an ensemble of instruments dominated by idiophones consisting of tuned knobbed
gongs and metal pee instruments
-tuning of instrument: no sense of standard tuning. May be tuned different in
different gamelans (all tuned to work together)
How big is the Gamelan?
-vary in size
-anywhere from 3-6 people or grow to be 10-20 people

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-in the case of a royal/aristocratic owned gamelans; the instruments are very
difficult to make – special crafts people, expensive to make
-some gamelans are made out of cheaper metals (iron/brass) are cheaper, but the
expensive ones are made from bronze (owned by royal courts, Indian consult,
aristocracy, universities)
-Indonesian gongs have a knob (boss) gives the precise tuning of the gong
Instrument types
-idiophones, membranophones, chordophones, areophones
instruments to remember:
-hanging gongs: largest of the tuned knobbed gongos
ohung and supported from long wooden poles
ogong ageng
okempul
largest gong and lowest pitch
-kettle gongs: much smaller and placed on a wooden platform (ice cube trays made
out of wood)
oKenong
When it is played slower, the notes can run out
When played quickly, it is important to damp
Bright ringing sound
Rhythm instruments
oKethuk
Much higher pitch than the kempul and kenong
Flatter top, has a short decay to the sound
Rhythm instruments
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oBoning family
-Tubed knobbed gong – there waves of sound is sustained for a long period of time
oSlow decay of pitch
oImportant to learn how to damp: put your hand on the knob/boss so you
can play several pitches in a row/quickly
-Metal-keyed instruments
oSaron family
Keys are placed above trough resonators
Bright ringing tone
oGender family
Different resonator
Set of resonators that look like tubes/cylinders placed vertically
side by side and keys are laid on top
Mellow, soft tone
oMelody instruments
oRebab
Chordophone, relative of the middle eastern rebab (tuning and
construction vary)
Played with the hands
oKendhang family
Set of 2 or 3 drums/membranophones
Double headed, heads are different sizes
Played with the hands, variety of strokes
Acting in some ways as a conductor of an orchestra – very
important for the rhythm of the piece
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