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Lecture 26

Pathology 3500 Lecture 26: Diseases of the GI Tract IPremium

6 pages13 viewsSpring 2018

Department
Pathology
Course Code
Pathology 3500
Professor
Jessica Shepherd
Lecture
26

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Disease of the Gi tract
Lecture Outline
Introduction
Esophageal cancer
Peptic ulcer disease
Appendicitis
Disease of the GI tract
Colonic diverticular disease
Inflammatory bowel disease
Crohn’s disease
Ulcerative colitis
I tract obstruction
Hernias
Large bowel cancer
Gi Tract
Esophagus
Gastroesophageal junction
Valve that separates the esophagus and the stomach
Stomach
Digestion starts here
Small bowel
Small in diameter but long in length
Duodenum
Jejunum
Ilium
Ileocecal valve
Large bowel
Rectum
Normal Function of the Gi Track
Digestion
Stomach
Lining of the stomach release acids and pepsin
Duodenum
Most of the digestion occurs here
Pancreas
Makes digestive enzymes and release it into the duodenum
Very important for digestion
Absorption
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Food
Occurs in the entire small bowel
If you lose enough small bowel you will need to be on IV
feeding for the rest of your life
Bile
Liver makes bile, gallbladder stores the bile (can live without the
gallbladder
Bile flows into the bile duct and into the duodenum
Water and electrolytes
Large bowel
Can do without the large bowel, just drink more
Sign and Symptoms of GI Disease
Loss of appetite
Nausea
Vomiting
Diarrhea
Pain
Bleeding
Occult bleeding
Can’t be seen with the naked eye
Is detected with a chemical test in the stool (most common test)
Visible bleeding
Hematemesis
Vomiting blood
“Coffee ground emesis”
Vomiting black blood
Melena
Black blood in stool
Bleeding in the duodenum or stomach, the digestive enzyme in here
changes the blood to black
Hematochezia
Red blood in stool
Blood is not exposed to the digestive enzyme that would change it to
black, stays red/maroon
Obstruction
Important
Length of the symptoms
How many time it occurs in the day
Quality of the pain, location of the pain
Are they passing gas? When was the last bowel movement?
Esophagus
Midline of the chest
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