Class Notes (835,730)
Canada (509,354)
Philosophy (1,299)
T A (7)
Lecture

LectureNotes2065.docx

5 Pages
138 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
Philosophy 2065F/G
Professor
T A
Semester
Spring

Description
th  Lecture 1: January 10     , 2013  Evil as Vice: What counts as “evil”? (Ancients vs. Christianity vs. Rousseau)  ­anything that impedes human suffering (sickness, disease, loss, misfortune, etc)  ­evil is something that harms you or “ruins” you (St. John, eg. moths to wool)  ­malice: “intention or desire to d evil or ill­will”    ­“begging the question” (fallacy): putting the question into the answer, pre­supposed ­natural disasters (because they cause a lot of the things mentioned above)  ­“morally corrupt condition of the heart that causes individuals to trespass against others”    ­take from Christianity point of view    ­culpable or not? Christian take is that man is made fundamentally flawed    ­culpable: should be held accountable because humans have will to resist “evil”   ­not culpable:  ­Rousseau/ Neiman: evil shifts from being out of our control to in our control by way of intention –  intentional human actions   ­evil person will do evil things or intend to do evil thinks whilst knowing that it is evil  Conclusion: Is there really an Evil Force out There?  ­defines evil: “thoughtless, careless, unkind intentional or malicious action by a human being”  ­Evil forces, things outside of the mortal realm do not get to count as real “evil”   ­including natural disasters, demons, etc.    ­more modern account of what evils is; Atheism vs. Theism ­animals capability for evil? Little capability for higher thought, would perform harmful and evil  deeds out of self perseverance, cannot understand that harm is being caused, does not have malicious  intent   ­however we should never presume to know the intention of animals (since we don’t) Examples of Evil in the World: ­Apartheid (47­95): government condoned theory on implementing segregation based on categories  of white, black, Asian, native.   ­inequalities were evil, racism was built into laws, fundamentally flawed system ­Tuskegee experiment: infected patients with syphilis and did not give them the vaccine in order to  study the effects of the disease    ­test subjects were mostly African­American males   ­were led to believe that effects of the disease differed in whites and blacks  ­Nagasaki & Hiroshima: murder and suffering, tested bomb on people knowing that they didn’t need  any more of a defense, bomb dropped on Hiroshima to stop conflict, dropped on Nagasaki in order to  test the bomb itself (and probably out of spite)  ­“Atrocities”: (all of the above) examples of evil on a massive scale, no room for argument of extent  of evil ­Lesser examples:  ­addictions such as gambling as well as the associated businesses that capitalize on these addictions  (eg. casino owners)  ­bullying: younger people involved, culpable or not since moral values are not instilled permanently  at that point th  Lecture 3: January 17     , 2013  Tuesday’s questions: ­do we want to say that the desire to do evil things count as evil?    ­difference between art admirer and the sadist? (art gallery for Monet, execution both    for their own pleasure)  ­can we talk about evil without talking about good?  ­privation: lack of a corresponding opposite  ­scale of good to no good (100­0%) where 0% is evil  ­can we talk about the 0% (evil) without having a correlating 100% (good)  ­subjective vs. objective scales?  ­if one person has a higher idea of good, would their idea of evil be proportionally raised? (imagine  the scale), they would consider more things evil because their idea of good is set higher than regular  people (also flip side to same idea, less good, thing that are evil seem less evil)  ­utilitarianism: net pleasure (utility), end product most important, means not so much   ­if end result is “good” then the means are justified even if they’re evil    ­John Stewart Mill ­deontology: rules, categorical imperative (universalizability), respect for humans   ­good or bad depends on the action’s adherence to rules (disobeying the law is evil)    ­Immanuel Kant  ­ethics of care: relations, performing an action that impedes one’s ability to relate to others or their  course of life counts as bad/ evil   ­Noddings  ­Is Svendson equivocating on “good”? ­fallacy of equivocation: using a term that has more than one meaning or sense but not specifying  which meaning is used in said context    ­uses objective evil + subjective good = some element of good, undefined, sneaky  “Toward the Phenomenology of Evil” ­phenomenologies try to understand the lives and experiences of another in a very informed way ­Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy* ­Phenomenology comes from phenomena (an expestence) and is defined as the study of  consciousness as experienced from a 1  person point of view    ­appearances of things  ▯things as they appear to us  ▯can be generalized to the ways    we experience things  ▯important for us; transforms into the meanings that we attach    to our experiences   ­“situatedness”: idea that each of us is situated within out bodies and cannot change that, therefore  objectiveness doesn’t exist, only subjectiveness does from our own experiences  ­when you are white, male, middle/upper class and English, there is a misunderstanding or a lack of  understanding towards the conceptual analysis, logical argumentation and temperance (keeping tepid)  of other people (especially the other gen
More Less

Related notes for Philosophy 2065F/G

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit