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Lecture 46

Physiology 3120 Lecture Notes - Lecture 46: Functional Residual Capacity, Lung Volumes, Tidal Volume


Department
Physiology
Course Code
PHYSIO 3120
Professor
Tom Stavraky
Lecture
46

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Lecture 46 Lung Volumes
Spirometry
- Spirometry: a method to measure lung volumes
o Inhale and exhale through a filter that detects lungs volumes and utilizes a computer
o Old fashion is an upside down bell that is suspended in water and air in the bell is
connected to a person such that they can inhale and exhale
When the person exhales, the bell move sup
When the person inhales, the bell moves down
Bell is connected to a pen that moves up and down
Inhale pen moves up
Exhale pen moves down
o Works the same in both systems
- Tidal Volume: is the volume of air inhaled with each breath at rest
o Increases with exercise
o Not the full lung volume
- Minute Volume or Pulmonary Ventilation is the volume of air inhaled per minute
Tidal Volume X Frequency of Respiration (how many times/min person breathes)
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- Example:
o Tidal Volume = 500 ml
o Frequency = 12 breaths/min
o Minute Volume = 6000 ml/min
o 6L of air go in and out of lung each minute
- Vital Capacity: is the volume of air that can be forcibly exhaled after a maximal inspiration
o Taking a breath in as deep as you can (max inspiration) and then exhale as much as
you can
- There is some reserve volume
o Look at how much air you can inhale in your normal breath vs. vital capacity, there
is a reserve volume where you can inspire more air than your resting tidal volume
- Inspiratory Reserve Volume (IRV): is the volume of air that can be forcibly inhaled
following a normal inspiration
- Expiratory Reserve Volume (ERV): is the volume of air that can be forcibly exhaled
following a normal exhalation
- Maximal Voluntary Ventilation (MVV): volume of air that can be moved into and out of the
lung in one min by voluntary effort
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- Also called Maximal Breathing Capacity
- Can go from 6L/min to increasing tidal volume to get a maximum breathing capacity (heavy
exercise to get in a lot more air in lungs)
- Average person: Normal MVV is in the range of 125 to 170 liters per min
- Residual Volume (RV): is the volume of air remaining in the lungs after a maximal
expiration
o Cannot exhale all of the air in the lungs
- Functional Residual Capacity (FRC): is the volume of air remaining in the lungs at the end
of a normal expiration
- Total Lung Capacity (TLC): is the volume of air in the lungs at the end of a maximal
inspiration
o TLC = Vital capacity + residual volume
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