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Lecture

Political Science 1020E Lecture Notes - Mary Wollstonecraft, Class Conflict, Social Darwinism


Department
Political Science
Course Code
Political Science 1020E
Professor
Nig

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Fascism, Feminism
22 November 2011
Who argued that means, or moral considerations, are as important the victory of
social?
Eduard Bernstein
Hitler and Nazism:
- two explanations for Hitler's rise to power
- economic - made possible by the depression, they were desperate (Hitler
seemed like the answer)
- charismatic - people were affected by his personality
- he wasn't beating around the bush, he was truthful and shared his ideas
- resentment about end of World War I
- many soliders felt that they hard done by
- German people (Volk) must defeat jews, communists, and liberals (their
enemies)
- need a strong, dominant leader (fuherprinzip)
- erotic to the people, magical gaze to people's eyes, without consent
- "pure reason in human norm" - people called Hitler that
- nationalism - racist, blood and soil, exclusive
- lebenssrau (living space) - intitled to Poland and move into their or even kicking
them out (started WWII)
- social darwinism (survivial of the fittest... the weak desive to die)
- racism and anti-semitism (only the fittest race should survive)
- nazisim = nationalism + racism
- Hitler explained why it is okay to be racist to jews (Henry Ford was anti-semitic
like Hitler)
Key Fascist Themes:
Paxton:
- sense of crisis needing radical solution
- subordination of individuals to the group
- one's group is a victim whose enemies must be attacked
- fear of liberalism, class conflict, and other alien forces
- permit community intergration by violence if necessary
- need for authority by natural (male) leaders embodying group's destiny
- superiority of leader's instincts to abstract and universal reason
- celebrate of violence and will, when devoted to group's success
- right of the chosen people to dominate others without moral restraint
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