Class Notes (905,480)
CA (538,413)
Western (51,518)
2137 (29)
Lecture

Lecture 1- crisis in the environment?

10 Pages
109 Views

Department
Political Science
Course Code
Political Science 2137
Professor
Ross Gibbons

This preview shows pages 1-3. Sign up to view the full 10 pages of the document.
Politics of the Environment--Political Science 2235 E
Lecture #1
Is There A Crisis in The Environment
1. Introduction
-major theme: to examine and determine (if possible) the extent to which
human political systems are capable of successfully addressing the
ecological question: 'to find a way of extracting from the different
ecosystems in which people have lived enough resources for maintaining
life--food, clothing, shelter, energy and other material goods...' without
destroying the ecosystems and, inevitably, the human life which is part of
them.
2. Politics: the resolution of conflict through the authoritative allocation of
values (who gets what, when and how) (Easton and Lasswell)
Government: the organization of people for the resolution of dispute and
conflict
Authoritarian Governments? Liberal-democracies?
Less than half although many democracies are unstable
-Canadian corporatism...hewers of wood, drawers of water...resource
exploiters
3. The Environment
environment
ecology
ecosystem
sustainable development
4. The Subject Matter: Population and the Politics of the Environment: the
critical element of population growth; the resources of the earth; temperate
and tropical rainforests; agriculture and soils; water resources; land use
practices; energy; the problem of pollution.
5. Origin of the Species:
-2 billion + years in the making; 2 million =\- years in development;
100,000 years of Homo Sapiens; 40,000 years of Homo Sapiens Sapiens
-the hunter-gatherers...4,000,000
-the First Great Transition ...a change in emphasis toward domestication of
plants and animals made it possible for a transition to agriculture and
herding; agriculture produced higher outputs which made it possible for
specialization: farmers and non-farmers; the development of craftspeople,
and, fairly quickly, ruling elites (first religious and then military)...the
development of stratified, hierarchical societies
-the Second Great Transition--the Industrial Revolution
-the Third Great Transition--globalization and the transmission of
Eurovalues to the entire world: individual self-interest and the
separation of man and nature
6. The Political Agenda: Politics as usual: always a crisis
-Rio, 1992
-the rise of neo-conservatism
-The Commonsense Revolution...not a mention...then, Walkerton!
-The Red Book, 1997--global warming
-2002 - ratifying Kyoto and Mr. Chrétien=s swan song
-2006 – is Kyoto dead under the Harper Conservatives?
7. A Behavioural and Social Crisis
-decline in carrying capacity: population growth continues as does global
warming; desertification, energy consumption
-the ecological footprint
8. Political Efficacy
-nature of brokerage politics and the domination in Canada of an elite form
of corporatism
9. Conclusion: The Story of Easter Island
-we assume that ecological disaster falls on the unsophisticated, the foolish,
the dumb
-Easter Island is the story of a society which was highly sophisticated but
when it crossed the line at which the island's forests could not be sustained
it steadily and irrevocably toward degradation
Politics of the Environment
Lecture # 1
Introduction
Major Theme:
To examine and determine (if possible) the extent to
which human political systems are capable of successfully
addressing the ecological question: 'to find a way of
extracting from the different ecosystems in which people
have lived enough resources for maintaining life--food,
clothing, shelter, energy and other material goods...'
without destroying the ecosystems and, inevitably, the
human life which is part of them.

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
Politics of the Environment--Political Science 2235 E Lecture #1 Is There A Crisis in The Environment 1. Introduction -major theme: to examine and determine (if possible) the extent to which human political systems are capable of successfully addressing the ecological question: 'to find a way of extracting from the different ecosystems in which people have lived enough resources for maintaining life--food, clothing, shelter, energy and other material goods...' without destroying the ecosystems and, inevitably, the human life which is part of them. 2. Politics: the resolution of conflict through the authoritative allocation of values (who gets what, when and how) (Easton and Lasswell) Government: the organization of people for the resolution of dispute and conflict Authoritarian Governments? Liberal-democracies? Less than half although many democracies are unstable -Canadian corporatism...hewers of wood, drawers of water...resource exploiters 3. The Environment environment ecology ecosystem sustainable development 4. The Subject Matter: Population and the Politics of the Environment: the critical element of population growth; the resources of the earth; temperate and tropical rainforests; agriculture and soils; water resources; land use practices; energy; the problem of pollution. 5. Origin of the Species: -2 billion + years in the making; 2 million =\- years in development; 100,000 years of Homo Sapiens; 40,000 years of Homo Sapiens Sapiens -the hunter-gatherers...4,000,000 -the First Great Transition ...a change in emphasis toward domestication of plants and animals made it possible for a transition to agriculture and herding; agriculture produced higher outputs which made it possible for specialization: farmers and non-farmers; the development of craftspeople, and, fairly quickly, ruling elites (first religious and then military)...the development of stratified, hierarchical societies -the Second Great Transition--the Industrial Revolution -the Third Great Transition--globalization and the transmission of Eurovalues to the entire world: individual self-interest and the separation of man and nature 6. The Political Agenda: Politics as usual: always a crisis -Rio, 1992 -the rise of neo-conservatism -The Commonsense Revolution...not a mention...then, Walkerton! -The Red Book, 1997--global warming -2002 - ratifying Kyoto and Mr. Chrétien=s swan song -2006 – is Kyoto dead under the Harper Conservatives? 7. A Behavioural and Social Crisis -decline in carrying capacity: population growth continues as does global warming; desertification, energy consumption -the ecological footprint 8. Political Efficacy -nature of brokerage politics and the domination in Canada of an elite form of corporatism 9. Conclusion: The Story of Easter Island -we assume that ecological disaster falls on the unsophisticated, the foolish, the dumb -Easter Island is the story of a society which was highly sophisticated but when it crossed the line at which the island's forests could not be sustained it steadily and irrevocably toward degradation Politics of the Environment Lecture # 1 Introduction Major Theme: To examine and determine (if possible) the extent to which human political systems are capable of successfully addressing the ecological question: 'to find a way of extracting from the different ecosystems in which people have lived enough resources for maintaining life--food, clothing, shelter, energy and other material goods...' without destroying the ecosystems and, inevitably, the human life which is part of them. Politics: the resolution of conflict through the authoritative allocation of values (who gets what, when and how) (Easton and Lasswell) Government: the organization of people for the resolution of dispute and conflict Authoritarian Governments? Liberal-democracies? Less than half although many democracies are unstable -Can
More Less
Unlock Document


Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit