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Lecture

5 -Conservatism 2.docx

3 Pages
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Department
Political Science
Course Code
Political Science 1020E
Professor
Charles Jones

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Conservatism: 2 Pages 93-102 Conservatism - To „conserve‟ or preserve something - Traditional/customary way of life - All may not want to conserve the same thing - Described as not wanting change - Most American-style conservatives advocate a free-market economy Classical Conservatives - Trying to preserve or restore an aristocratic society under attack from liberalism & French Revolution - Defend the traditional social hierarchy - Strong government - Skeptical of individual freedom and equality of opportunity Modern Conservatives - Individualist conservatives - Reducing size and scope of government in order to free individuals to compete for profit - Liassez-faire capitalism - Similar to classical and neoclassical liberalism Politics of Imperfection - Conservatism is called „the political philosophy of imperfection‟ - It means that we are neither as intelligent nor as good as we like to think - Conservatives believe this is how it is and will always be: in response to above - Basically, those who want radical change and hope for a utopian societies end up doing more harm than good - Conservatives have been called „anti-ideology‟ - Believe that we do much better with slow progress than immediate and drastic change Edmund Burke - Considered the founder of Conservatism - Saw the French Revolution as a bad attempt at creating a new society from the ground up Burke‟s Career - An Irishman in the British parliament - Critic of the French Revolution of 1789 - Against the revolutionaries‟ views of human nature, society, freedom, revolution, and government Human Nature and Society: 1 - Creatures of habit, custom, tradition - Humans are not perfectible or changeable by social engineering - Against the idea of atomistic, isolated individ
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