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Political Science 2211E Outline 2013-14.pdf

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Department
Political Science
Course
Political Science 2211E
Professor
Adam Harmes
Semester
Winter

Description
University of Western Ontario: Department of Political Science POLITICAL SCIENCE 2211E Business and Government Fall-Winter 2013-2014 Mondays 3:30-6:30 p.m., KB 106 Course Director Dr. Adam Harmes Office: 4155 Social Science Centre (Political Science Dept., 4th Floor) Email: [email protected] Office Hours: Mondays 1-2:30 p.m. Course Description: This course reviews the relationship between business and government emphasizing both the Canadian and global contexts. On the government side, the focus will be primarily on the federal government while on the business side the focus will be primarily on the large public companies (that is, those listed on the stock exchange). With this focus in mind, the course examines historical and contemporary issues in business-government relations as well as a variety of theories and concepts that are useful for understanding them. Notice on Pre/Anti-requisites: Students are responsible for ensuring that they have successfully completed all course prerequisites and that they have NOT taken an anti-requisite course. Lack of prerequisites may not be used as a basis for appeal. If a student is found to be ineligible for a course, they may be removed from it at any time and they will receive no adjustment to their fees. This decision cannot be appealed. If a student finds that they do not have the course requisites, they should drop the course well before the end of the add/drop period. This will not only help their academic record but will also ensure that spaces are made available to other students. Course Structure: The course meets weekly on Monday afternoons from 3:30-6:30 p.m. and will consist of two hour lectures from 3:30-5:30 p.m. and one hour tutorials from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Required Readings: A course reading kit is available from the university book store and additional readings are posted on the course website. Evaluation: Debate 10% In scheduled tutorials First Term Essay 25% Due 4 November First Term Exam 20% Exam Period Op-Ed Writing Assignment 20% Due 10 March Final Exam 25% Exam Period 1 Tutorial Debates 10% Each student will participate in one debate. Debates will take place from 5:30-6:30 pm during the tutorial period after the lecture. The sign-up list for debate topics will be posted on the instructor’s office door and students must sign-up for a topic no later than before class on the 24 of September. A list of debate topics and dates is available on the course website. When students sign-up for a debate topic they must choose either the affirmative or negative position. If some topics are under-subscribed, some students may be asked to choose other topics in order to ensure four persons per team. Each team must provide a 3 page, typed, point-form summary of their main arguments including a bibliography of no less than 10 sources. The debates will be graded on the basis of an overall team mark worth 10% of the course. A debate instruction sheet and grading guide is available on the course website. Students who miss their debates without prior arrangement with the course instructor will be given a grade of zero. Tutorial attendance is mandatory. Attendance will be taken at random with penalty marks being deducted from individual debate grades. First Term Essay 25% One first term research essay is due on 4 November and should be 12-15 typed double-spaced pages in length (longer papers will not be accepted). The purpose of the essay is to identify the ideas and interests involved in the debate over a specific public policy issue and to argue in favour of one side or the other. In doing so, students will: identify the key ideas and arguments on each side of the debate and explain which theoretical approach they connect to (i.e. neoliberal or Keynesian-welfare); identify the specific interest groups that support each side of the debate; and, using detailed research, argue in favour of one side of the debate. The public policy issue for the essay will be chosen by students based on a list at the end of this course outline. The essays will be marked for research, argument, organization and writing style and should conform to the format that will be discussed in detail in class. An essay grading guide is available on the course website. Bibliographies must have at least 10 sources which conform to the standards outlined in class. Essays are due at the beginning of class no later than 3:30 pm. Once the lecture begins, the paper is late. Late essays will receive a late penalty of 15%. Late essays are then due the following week at the start of class no later than 3:30. After that, the essay will not be accepted and will receive a grade of zero. Extensions will only be granted for documented medical and other emergencies in accordance with university policy (available at https://studentservices.uwo.ca/ secure/index.cfm). All essays must also be submitted to turnitin.com through the course website as outlined in class. First Term Exam 20% The first term exam will cover material from the lectures and readings and will include both multiple choice and essay-style questions. It will be held on a date to be determined by the Registrar during the December exam period. No electronic devices will be allowed. Op-Ed Writing Piece 20% One op-ed writing piece is due on 10 March and it should be between 700-800 words in length. Students will write an op-ed on one of the debate topics other than the topic they did for their debate. Op-ed pieces will be marked for research, organization and writing style and should conform to the format that will be discussed in detail in class. An op-ed grading guide is 2 available on the course website. Op-eds are due at the beginning of class no later than 3:30 pm. Once the lecture begins, the op-ed is late. Late op-eds will receive a late penalty of 15%. Late op-eds are then due the following week at the start of class no later than 3:30. After that, the op- ed will not be accepted and will receive a grade of zero. Extensions will only be granted for documented medical and other emergencies in accordance with university policy (available at https://studentservices.uwo.ca/secure/index.cfm). All op-eds must also be submitted to turnitin.com through the course website as outlined in class. Final Exam 25% The final exam will cover material from the lectures and readings from the second term only and will include both multiple choice and essay-style questions. It will be held on a date to be determined by the Registrar during the April exam period. No electronic devices will be allowed. Lecture Notes and PPT Slides Lecture notes and PowerPoint slides will NOT be posted. If you miss class, you will need to get the notes from other students. Academic Offenses and Plagiarism: Scholastic offenses are taken seriously and students are directed to read the university policy at: http://www.uwo.ca/univsec/handbook/appeals/scholastic_discipline_undergrad.pdf. As noted above, essays and op-ed writing assignments must be submitted both in hard copy and electronically to the plagiarism checking website turnitin.com (available through the course website and under license to the University). Please be advised that: All papers submitted for such checking will be included as source documents in the reference database for the purpose of detecting plagiarism of papers subsequently submitted to the system. Use of the service is subject to the licensing agreement, currently between the University of Western Ontario and Turnitin.com. COURSE SCHEDULE Sept. 9 Course Introduction and Essay Writing This class will be used to introduce the general subject matter of the course and to outline the course structure, readings and requirements. The class will also examine specific requirements for the first term essay as well as various skills associated with the research and writing of academic papers. Sept. 16 The Science of Election Campaigns I This class will include a video presentation to introduce the science of election campaigns prior to the following lecture. Students should take notes on the video. No Tutorial 3 Sept. 23 The Science of Election Campaigns II This class examines the strategy, tactics and techniques used in the fighting of modern election campaigns including concepts such as ‘political triage’, ‘political marketing’ and the key components of an election strategy including the ‘air war’ and ‘ground war’. Required Readings: Thomas Flanagan. 2010 “Campaign Strategy: Triage and the Concentration of Resources” in H. MacIvor (ed.) Election (Toronto: Emond Montgomery Publications Ltd., 327 pages, ISBN 978-1-55239-321-5), pp. 155-172. Susan Delacourt and Alex Marland. 2009. “From Sales to Marketing: The Evolution of the Party Pitch”. Policy Options. September 2009, pp. 46-51. Tutorial: Discussion of Debate Requirements and Organization of Debating Teams Sept. 30 The Canadian Political System This class examines the Canadian and US political systems including key institutions such as the executive, the legislature, the judiciary and political parties. Required Readings: Donald Savoie. 1999. “The Rise of Court Government in Canada”. Canadian Journal of Political Science. 32(4): 635-664. Jonathan Malloy. 2006. “Is There a Democratic Deficit in Canadian Legislatures and Executives?” in J. Grace and B. Sheldrick (eds.), Canadian Politics: Democracy and Dissent (Toronto: Pearson/Prentice Hall, 392 pages, ISBN0-13-243372-9), pp. 61-84. Tutorial: Debating Teams Planning Meeting Oct. 7 The Liberal/Neoliberal Approach to Economic Policy This class examines the key assumptions and arguments of the liberal/neoliberal approach to economic policy. Required Readings: Michael Howlett, Alex Netherton and M. Ramesh. The Political Economy of Canada: An Introduction (2nd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999, 384 pages, ISBN 0-19-541348-2) Chapter 2, “Liberal Political Economy” pp. 17-35. Tutorial: Debate #1 Oct. 14 Thanksgiving Holiday - No Class Oct. 21 The Keynesian-Welfare Approach to Economic Policy This class examines the key assumptions and arguments of the Keynesian-welfare approach to economic policy. Required Readings: Richard Lipsey, Christopher Ragan and Paul Courant. Economics (9th Canadian Edition, 1997, Addison-Wesley Publishers Ltd, 865 pages, ISBN 0-673-98358-7) Chapter 18, “The Benefits and Costs of Government Intervention” pp. 381-402. Tutorial: Debate #2 4 Oct. 28 The Politics of Economic Policy and the Canadian Market Structure This class examines the politics of economic policy including the relationship between ideas and interests and the political spectrum in Canada and the United States. It also examines the basic structure of the Canadian market including business concentration, foreign ownership, the role of natural resources and Canada’s economic r
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