Class Notes (834,357)
Canada (508,514)
Lecture

Hobbes and the State of Nature Continued - January 14th

3 Pages
47 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
Political Science 2237E
Professor
Mike Laurence
Semester
Fall

Description
Hobbes and the State of Nature (Continued) January 16, 2014 What is the state of nature • Not understood as a social state overcome, but rather as a dark shadow that  necessarily accompanies any state of order/organization.   • With the sovereign, comes a unified set of meanings and way of think and using  concepts – one of the under represented aspects of Hobbes’ theories.  The idea of  conceptual order and thought in meaning is very important to Hobbes – relates to  the imperative of modern government.   • Hobbes prescribes an awe­inspiring order as a response made in fear, to (the  threat of) anarchy and chaos in the world. Groups Questions: 1. Can you think of a real contemporary or historical example of the state of  nature?  Was it solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short? Explain. THE MARS ONE PROJECT The future (permanent) expedition to Mars has the potential to develop into the  state of nature. • Have no contact with other societies. • No established order. • No government structures, systems, or state institutions in place.  This  includes currency, healthcare, market or economic activity, or trading. • Unprecedented and ultimately uncontrollable. • Rights and obligations have yet to be determined and prioritized. • Under no legal jurisdiction. • No military force, police, or authority. • Solitary – no other cities, states, forms of life (that we know of), etc. • Unpredictable living and climate conditions. • No resources to sustain survival. • Procreation Other examples:  • Trench warfare in WWI. Hobbes’ State of Nature • IF Hobbes is wrong, is his political prescription still necessary or relevant?  Can it still be considered applicable to any situations – past, present, or future? Why does this matter? • What would the implications be if Hobbes was wrong?  • Perhaps Hobbes could accommodate. • For Hobbes, humans are naturally anti­social and anti­political – Aristotle  disagrees. Let’s Get Critical • For Hobbes, because human nature operates in a certain way, the state of nature  functions to respond to this natural condition. • Macpherson o Ho
More Less

Related notes for Political Science 2237E

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit