Class Notes (834,986)
Canada (508,846)
Psychology (6,247)
Psychology 1000 (2,471)
Prof (56)
Lecture

Think and Intelligence

5 Pages
54 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
Psychology 1000
Professor
Prof
Semester
Winter

Description
Thinking and Intelligence February 4, 2014 When we think of thinking – which psychological perspective might we MOST think it  to? ­ Behavioural views ­ Sociocultural views ­ Cognitive views Thought: Elements of Cognition Concepts • A mental category that groups objects, relations, activities, abstractions, or  qualities having common properties. • Basic concepts: concepts tat have a moderate number of instances and that are  easier to acquire than those having few or many instances. • Prototype: an especially representative example of a concept. • Proposition: A unit of meaning that is made up of concepts and expresses a single  idea. • Cognitive schemas: Integrated mental network of knowledge, beliefs, and  expectations concerning a particular topic or aspect of the world • Mental images: Mental representation that mirrors or resembles the thing it  represents (occur in most sensory modalities)  How Conscious is Thought? Subconscious processes • Mental processes occurring outside of conscious awareness but accessible to  consciousness when necessary (e.g., driving a car) Nonconscious processes • Mental processes occurring outside of and not available to conscious awareness  (e.g., getting the milk out of the fridge). Types of Nonconscious Processes Implicit Learning • Learning that occurs when you acquire knowledge about something without being  aware of how you did so and without being able to state exactly what it is you  have learned. Mindlessness • Mental inflexibility, inertia and obliviousness to the present context. Reasoning Rationally Reasoning: Drawing conclusions or inferences from observations, facts, or assumptions. Formal reasoning problems: problems solved using established methods (algorithms  and logic) usually a single correct solution. Informal reasoning problems:  there is often no clearly correct solution. Deductive Reasoning  • When a conclusion follows necessarily from certain premises • If premises true, conclusion must be true Examples: ­ all men are mortal. Joe is a man. Therefore Joe is mortal.  ­ Bachelor’s are unmarried men. Bill is unmarried. Therefore, Bill is a bachelor. Inductive Reasoning ­ When the premises provide support for a conclusion, but it’s still possible for  conclusion to be false. (txt book diagram) Premise true + premise true + possibility of discrepant info = conclusion probably  true Examples:  ­ Suzy is a doctor. Doctors are smart. Suzy is assumed to be smart. ­ All observed brown dogs are small dogs. Therefore, all small dogs are brown. ­ All small fuzzy animals are cats. Not necessarily true because of skunk Informal Reasoning Heuristic • Rule of thumb that suggests a course of action or guides problem­solving but does  not guarantee an optimal solution Dialectical Reasoning • Process in which opposing facts are weighed and compared in order to determine  the best solution or resolve differences Critical Thinking (Reflective Judgment) Pre­reflective stages: assumption that correct answers can be obtained through the  senses or from the authorities Quasi­reflective stages: recognize limits to absolutely certainty, realize judgments  should be supported by reasons, yet pay attention to evidence that confirms beliefs. Reflective stages: consider evidence from a variety of sources and reason dialectically. Barriers to Reasoning Rationality Exaggerating the improbable • Common bias to exaggerate the probability of rare events (e.g., getting in a plane  crash) • Affect heuristic: tendency to consult one’s emotions instead of estimating  probabilities objectively • Availability heuristic:  tendency to judge *** finished def. • Avoiding Loss ­  Million Dollar Win ­ WE respond more cautiously when choices are farmed in terms of the risk of  losing something than if same choice framed in terms of gain ­ Framing Effect: The tendency for people’s choices to be affected by how a  choice is presented or framed ­ Goal to minimize losses  Barriers to Reasoning Rationally  The Fairness Bias  • A sense of fairness often takes precedence over rational self­interest when people  make economic choices The Hindsight Bias • The tendency to overestimate one’s ability to have predicted an event once the  outcome is known; the “I knew it all along” phenomenon The Confirmation Bias: the tendency to look for or pat attention to only info that  confirms one’s own belief. Mental Sets: A tendency to solv
More Less

Related notes for Psychology 1000

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit