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Lecture

Social Change Lecture

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Department
Sociology
Course
Sociology 1021E
Professor
Catherine Corrigall- Brown
Semester
Winter

Description
Social Change 04/08/2014 Routes to Social Change Electoral Legal  Cultural Social Movements What is a social movement A group of people who try to change, or resist change, in society Participation in social movements is irrational for two reasons: It is against cost­ benefit calculation (high cost, low ben.) Individual effort doesn’t increase chance of success (1 person cant make a difference) Collective Action Problem Individuals tend to evade participation in collective action (like social movements) because they still benefit  from whatever is gained whether or not they contribute­ Public Goods Inference of collection action problem So if we all get the benefits and it is a lot of time and energy to be ivolved, no one should ever get involved  in collective action We should all just sit at home and wait for good things to happen Conclusion: collective action will occur How can we explain the collective actions that have occurred There must be something we are missing Why do people participate even if they could just sit at home and get the benefits? Why Participate­ Sometimes it does make a difference! Critical Mass Conducive Political Contexts Other reasons Social networks  Values  Identity Case: Clayoquot Sound, BC 1993­ BC Govt. announces it will allow clear­ cut logging in old growth forests of Clayoquot Sound 12000 protesters blocked ac
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