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Lecture

Sociology 1020 Lecture Notes - Nuclear Family, Heterogamy, Exogamy


Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOC 1020
Professor
Kim Luton

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Family
- First agent of socialization
In what kind of ‘Family’ do you live?
1. Nuclear traditional -2 parent - 73
2. Extended family – mx. generations/ aunts, uncles - 1
3. Lone parent male headed - 6
4. Lone parent female headed - 10
5. Blended family - 6
6. Same-sex family - 2
7. Polygamous - 3
8. Other - 0
The Family:
Basic Concepts
Social institution that unites people in cooperative groups to oversee the bearing and raising
of children
Kinship…
- a social bond based on blood, marriage or adoption
• Family Unit…
– defined as two or more people who are related by blood, adoption, marriage or some other
form of extended commitment and who reside together
- families form around marriage
The Family:
Basic Concepts
• Nuclear family…
– One or two parents and their unmarried children
– SNAF – standard north American family
- most common family type
• Extended family…
– nuclear family plus other kin (grandparents, uncles, ect.) – 2.8% of families in Canada of
extended
- immigrant families
- first nations
The Family:
Basic Concepts
• Endogamy…
–marriage between people of the same social category.
- within your own group (same race, same class, same religion, ect.)
• Exogamy…
–marriage between people of different social categories.
- outside your group
What sex are you?
1. Female - 62
2. Male - 38
Which does your family wish you to do?
1. Endogamy – 56 – 45: Males, 61: Females
2. Exogamy – 44 – 55: Males, 39: Females
Will your family arrange a marriage for you?
1. Yes – 3 – 2: Males, 3: Females
2. No – 97 – 98: Males, 98: Females
The Family:
Basic Concepts
- person’s choices are guided by social forces
Propinquity: spatial proximity (fall in love with people of the same social class, religion, ect.)
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Homogamy: people marry those like themselves regarding religion, ethnicity, education, etc.
(think ”characteristics”)
- choosing to marry someone based of these characteristics
Heterogamy: Marriage between people who are dissimilar in some important regard such as
religion, ethnicity, social class, personality or age.
- choosing to marry someone because they are different
Descent
- kinship and we inherits and who doesn’t
• Descent—the way people trace kinship over generations.
• bilateral—descent traced through both the mother’s and father’s side of the family.
• patrilineal—descent is traced only to the father’s side (most common, for example, India)
• matrilineal—descent is traced only to the mother’s side (much less common, the brother of
the mother passes descent on to his nephew)
Residential Patterns
• Patrilocality: married couple live with or near the husband’s family
• Matrilocality: wife’s family
• Neolocality: alone
When married, in what residential pattern do you expect to live?
1. Patrilocality - 4
2. Matrilocality - 11
3. Neolocality - 85
Marriages & Arrangements
What is Marriage?
• Marriage: a legally sanctioned relationship, usually involving economic cooperation as well
as sexual activity & childbearing, that people expect to be enduring
What is Marriage?
• Marriage can be defined as a commitment & an ongoing exchange.
1. Commitment – contract that outlines the rights and obligation
2. Ongoing exchange – inter dependence
3. Expressive exchanges – provide the basic necessities
4. Instrumental exchanges
Marriage Patterns
• In most industrial societies, laws prescribe monogamy (uniting of two partners, only legal
marriage in Canada)
- cereal monogamy (one partner after another)
• Polygamy…
–marriage that unites three or more (one male, and the rest females)
– Polygyny…
• two or more women (Winston Blackmore, sect = moron)
– Polyandry…
• two or more men
• Institutional Convergence
Would you engage in ‘polygyny’?
1. Yes
2. No
Would you engage in ‘polyandry’?
1. Yes
2. No
Marriage Rates in Canada
• Year Canadian Pop Marriages Rates/ per1000
••
1921 8,787,549 71,254 7.9
• 1931 10,376,386 68,239 6.4
• 1951 14,009,429 128,408 9.2
• 1971 21,568,310 172,251 8.9
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