Class Notes (835,629)
Canada (509,297)
Sociology (3,242)
Lecture

Class 4 - January 22nd.docx

5 Pages
83 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
Sociology 2260A/B
Professor
Georgios Fthenos
Semester
Spring

Description
nd January 22   Theories of Law and Society • The European Pioneers • Under natural law, European scholars believed:  Law in any society was a reflection of a universally valid set of legal principles • Mid 1800s – natural law is displaced by historical and evolutionary interpretations of law and legal  positivism  Legal positivism – legal and moral are separate Natural Law • Unwritten body of universal moral principles that underlie the ethical and legal norms • Natural law is often contrasted with positive law, which consists of the written rules and regulations  enacted by government • The term natural law is derived from the roman tern jus naturale • Adherents to natural law philosophy are known as naturalists • Divine Natural Law  Represents the system of principles believed to have been revealed or inspired by God or  some other supreme and supernatural being  The divine principles are typically reflected by authoritative religious writings such as  Scripture  Primarily been replaced by positivist law  Incest has always been seen as a wrong thing because of nature, so therefore a natural law Theories of Law and Society • Baron de Montesquieu  Challenged the underlying assumptions of natural law  He considered law as an integral component to a person’s culture  No good or bad laws – all relative  Each law must be considered in relation to its background, surroundings, characteristics of  society  If the law fits well for that community/society its considered a good law, if not, its considered  a bad law  Separation of powers ­ Legislative, executive and judicial ­ Legislative: enact laws ­ Executive: enforce and administrate laws ­ Judicial: exhibit laws established  Influenced the framework of current legal systems • Herbert Spencer  British philosopher  Theory of unregulated competition  Influenced by Charles Darwin  Survival of the fittest  Evolution of civilization and law ­ Primitive homogeneity to ultimate heterogeneity  Two main stages in the development of civilizations ­ Primitive/military: war and status are used as regulatory mechanisms ­ Higher/industrial: freedom, peace, contracts are used to control – human progress marked by  continual increase in individual liberties  Strongly opposed to governmental programs designed to alleviate economically weaker  groups  Any type of social legislation would interfere with laws of natural selection  Proponent of the contract  Societal relations should be regulated by mutual agreements, not by government imposed  norms/regulations  Society doesn’t need supervision • Sir Henry Sumner Maine  Legal history shows pattern of evolution – trace legal development in societies  “The movement of progressive societies has hitherto been a movement from status to  contract”  Move from status to contract: through the course of history we see the gradual dissolution of  family dependency and the growth of individual … (22 mins) in its place  Along with Spencer, influenced the notion of laissez­faire – government shouldn’t interfere  with society (23 mins) Classical Sociological Theorists • Karl Marx  Very influential legal theorist  Community manifesto  Every society rests on an economic foundation (mode of production) o (1) Physical or technological arrangement of economic activity o (2) Social relations of production  Three principal assumptions of law 1. Law is a product of revolving economic forces 2. Law is a tool used by the ruling class to maintain power and control over the lower class 3. In a communist society law with wither away and disappear • Max Weber  Typology of legal systems  Law is either rational or irrational o Rational procedures involve the use of logic and scientific methods to obtain specific  objectives o Irrational procedures rely on ethical or mystical considerations (magic or faith in  supernatural)  Law can be formal or substantive o Formal law: making decisions on the basis of established rules regardless of the notion of  fairness o Substantive law: takes into account the circumstances of the individual cases when  determining justice  Four ideal types 1. Substantive irrationality: occurs when a case is decided on some unique religious, ethical or  political basis (look up in recorder) 2. Formal irrationality: rules based on supernatural forces – no one tries to understand why or  clarify why something works – strict adherence to it (ex. 10 commandments, oaths) 3. Substantive rationality: see the application of rules from non legal sources (religion,  ideology, science) and rules are derived from specific sources – concern for justice with  regards for outcomes in individual cases 4. Formal rationality: modern day legal systems – use of consistent logical rules, independent of  morals, religion – equally applied to all cases  Three types of administrative justice: 1. Khandi justice: dispensed by an Islamic judge – based on religion, lacking procedural rules  and is almost completely arbitrary 2. Empirical justice: refer to interpreting precedence, more rational than Khandi – notably short  of complete rationality 3. Rational justice: based on beurocratic principles – universal – facts of case  Modern society is the pursuit of the rational • Emile Durkheim  The division of labor in societ
More Less

Related notes for Sociology 2260A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit