Class Notes (836,424)
Canada (509,786)
Sociology (3,242)
Prof (4)
Lecture

SYMBOLIC INTERACTIONISM feb 24 - sociology.docx

3 Pages
54 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
Sociology 2271A/B
Professor
Prof
Semester
Winter

Description
SYMBOLIC INTERACTIONISM: Feb  24, 2014 C. COOLEY, G.H. MEAD, E. GOFFMAN, W.E.B. DUBOIS KEY POINTS • Pioneers of Symbolic Interactionism: i) C. Cooley: “primary and secondary groups”; “looking glass self”; ii) G.H. Mead: “things/objects”; “I/Me”; iii) E. Goffman: “dramaturgy”; “impression management”; iv) W.E.B. Dubois: “double consciousness”; “double sight” PIONEERS OF SYMBOLIC INTERACTIONISM • Charles Horton Cooley (1864­1929) • George Herbert Mead (1863­1931) • American scholars who influenced symbolic interactionism; • Interested in the study of self in interaction with others; • Believe in the interrelationship between self and society; PIONEERS OF SYMBOLIC INTERACTIONISM Macrosocial Theorists e.g. Comte,Durkheim,  Marx and functionalists e.g. Parsons and  Merton:  Values  Norms  Roles –          Individual ­­­     action Status  PIONEERS OF SYMBOLIC INTERACTIONISM Microsocial theorists e.g. Weber, Simmel,  Cooley and Mead: Values  Norms  Roles          Individual (self Interaction)            Interpretation              Action  Status  C. Cooley (1864­1929) Key Concepts: • Primary groups: Smaller in size (communities), close personal relationships,  connected by close bonds – smaller the group the closer they are and easier and  more chances to help one another in their communities; • Secondary groups: Larger, more impersonal, and higher division of roles, more  complex, more population so you don’t have more face to face involvement; ­  Durkheim – mechanical and organic. Parsons used – expressive and instrumental  relationships. • Looking­glass Self: “the imagination of our appearance to the other person; the  imagination of his judgment of that appearance, and some sort of self­feeling,  such as pride or mortification”. – refers to our perception of self – we perceive  ourselves as someone, as a reflection of a reaction or opinion of those we interact  with. We imagine ourselves to look or be a certain way (confident or insecure,  ugly or beautiful) because we imagine or think about how others see or perceive  of. – can make us proud or ashamed – self­profiling prophecy. E.g. eating  disorders. E.g. shopping addictions – keep up or at top of trends to self­fulfill,  thinking you need to look good to have others perceive you or judge you better. G.H. Mead (1863­1931) Mind, Self and Society – book he published – talks about indiviudals as active  participants in society – self and self interaction. Things don’t have meaning unless  individual has some kind of interaction with it and society Key Concepts: • Things and Objects; Things = stimuli of any independent individual. Thi
More Less

Related notes for Sociology 2271A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit