Class Notes (835,285)
Canada (509,065)
Sociology (3,236)
Prof (4)
Lecture

STRUCTURAL FUNCTIONALISM monday jan 13.docx

4 Pages
87 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
Sociology 2271A/B
Professor
Prof
Semester
Winter

Description
STRUCTURAL FUNCTIONALISM: TALCOTT PARSONS January 13,  2014 KEY POINTS 1) Background to Functionalism and       Structural Functionalism 2) Key Contributions of Talcott Parsons: i) Theory of Action ii) Patterns of Variable Scheme iii) AGIL CONTEXT OF FUNCTIONALISM AND STRUCTURAL FUNCTIONALISM Functionalism:  • Grew out of Durkheim’s thinking; • Society is a sum of interrelated parts; each part plays a role in the sum – different  parts can be politics, economics, religion, law (makes society work) Structural Functionalism: • Grew out of post WWII; • Concerned with specific structures or conditions to allow social order; • Main proponents: Kingsley Davis, Wilbert Moore, Talcott Parsons and Robert  Merton KEY CONTRIBUTIONS OF TALCOTT PARSONS Talcott Parsons (1902­1979): • His sociology influenced by biological studies; ­ converted to social science • Proposed “Grand Theory” to explain all that goes on in society; • Concept of social system: different parts of society fit together according to 4  systems: i) cultural – shared norms and values (e.g. religious beliefs, languages, national  values) ii) social – social interactions between individuals and groups and roles they play in the  particular environment iii) personality – motivations, individual needs, attitudes that become part of one’s  personality  iv) behavioural organism – biological aspect of being human, biological attributes,  race/ ethnicity, physical attributes they are born with, physical environments that human  beings live in • Socialization links the four levels together – learn from family, culture, and learn  from friends, co­workers, teachers. Parson’s made this model so it also can be  used for other groups whether legal or illegal settings – e.g. gang ­membership in  a gang – have to share same cultural values. Everybody must adopt the gang  expectations and expected behavior. Also, tie one persons personality, as gangs  have different needs and motivations on actions. Lastly, the must have certain  skill in order to avoid getting caught and performing illegal activity and also not  getting injured. • KEY CONTRIBUTIONS OF TALCOTT PARSONS • Theory of Action: “motivation toward gratification”: • Example: Means (money    Personal and external                 and brains)        conditions (time off) BA Degree Person “X”    (goal) Normative Standards  (pass courses) KEY CONTRIBUTIONS OF TALCOTT PARSONS Pattern Variables Scheme: Traditional Societies: Expressive – b/c the relationship is more personal and informal (greater face­to­face  interactions). (MECHANICAL) – everyone works together to common goal 1) Ascription – birth characteristcs? 2) Diffuseness – higher expectations places between fam. And friends to help out one  another (step up) – be truthful, share, cooperate 3) Affectivity – higher emotional bonds – eg. Parents and children, lovers 4) Particularism – refers to prioritizing choosing someone based on a personal connection  – someone you know well – fam. Friends – jobs, babysitting (fam first) ­ boys first (money) 5) Collectivity – name of collective good for decisions to satisfy the needs and interest of  the entire community. – e.g. universal health care benefits everyone. Jobs involving  putting society first are Non­profit organizations (shelters), police officers, army, leaders,  priests. Also, arranged marriage is a collective decision Modern Ind. Societies: ­ more population, more formal, can go to specialists to gain  certain knowledge. (ORGANIC) – larger, complex, politicians, law enforcement experts  so you have to pay few to access these. Instrumental 1) Achievement – applying for a job (choose best resume) 2) Specificity 3) Neutrality – eg. Employers and employees. Not as close of emot
More Less

Related notes for Sociology 2271A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit